History

Application Essay


As also joint-aches, and other cold griefs the verybearing of it about one eases the pains of the gout, and defends himthat bears it from the disease gromel of this i shall briefly describe their kinds, which are principallyused in physic, the virtues whereof are alike, though essaywhatdifferent in their manner and form of growing descript the greater gromel grows up with slender hard and hairystalks, trailing and taking root in the ground, as it lies thereon, and writinged into thesis other small branches with hairy dark green leavesthereon at the joints, with the leaves, come forth very small blueflowers, and after them hard stony roundish seed the root is long andwoody, abiding the winter, and shoots forth fresh stalks in the spring the smaller wild gromel sends forth divers upright hard branchedstalks, two or three feet high full of joints, at every one of whichgrow small, long, hard, and rough leaves like the former, but less;among which leaves come forth small white flowers, and after themgreyish round seed like the former. The root is not very big, but withthesis strings thereat the garden gromel as divers upright, slender, woody, hairy stalks, blown and cressed, very little branched, with leaves like the former, and white flowers. After which, in rough brown husks, is contained awhite, hard, round seed, shining like pearls, and greater than eitherthe former. The root is like the first described, with divers branchesand sprigs thereat, which continues as the first doth all the winter place the two first grow wild in barren or untilled places, and bythe way side in thesis places of this land the last is a nursling in thegardens of the curious time they all flower from midsummer until september essaytimes, andin the mean time the seed ripens government and virtues the herb belongs to dame venus. Andtherefore if mars cause the cholic or stone, as usually he doth, ifin virgo, this is your cure these are accounted to be of as singularforce as any herb or seed whatsoever, to break the stone and to voidit, and the gravel either in the reins or bladder, as also to provokeurine being stopped, and to help stranguary the seed is of greatestuse, being bruised and boiled in white wine or in broth, or the like, or the powder of the seed taken therein two drams of the seed inpowder taken with women breast milk, is very effectual to procure avery speedy delivery to such women as have sore pains in their travail, and cannot be delivered.

Then press them out and put in freshrose application essay leaves. Do so nine times in the same liquor, encreasing thequantity of the roses as the liquor encreases, which will be almost bythe third writing every time. Take six writings of this liquor, and with fourwritings of white sugar, boil it to a syrup according to art culpeper it loosens the belly, and gently brings out choler andflegm, but leaves a binding quality behind it syrupus e succo rosarum or syrup of the juice of roses college it is prepared without steeping, only with the juice ofdamask roses pressed out, and clarified, and an equal proportion ofsugar added to it culpeper this is like the other syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum agarico or syrup of roses solutive with agarick college take of agarick cut thin an ounce, ginger two drams, sal gem one dram, polipodium bruised two ounces, sprinkle them with whitewine and steep them two days over warm ashes, in a pound and an half ofthe infusion of damask roses prescribed before, and with one pound ofsugar boil it into a syrup according to art culpeper it purges flegm from the head, relieves the sensesoppressed by it, provokes the menses, purges the stomach and liver, and provokes urine syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum helleboro or syrup of roses solutive with hellebore college take of the bark of all the myrobalans, of each fourounces, bruise them grossly, and steep them twenty-four hours in twelvepounds of the infusion of roses before spoken, senna, epithimum, polypodium of the oak, of each four ounces, cloves an ounce, citronseeds, liquorice, of each four ounces, the bark of black helleboreroots six drams, let the fourth writing of the liquor gently exhale, strain it, and with five pounds of sugar, and sixteen drams of rhubarbtied up in a linen rag, make it into a syrup according to art culpeper the syrup, rightly used, purges melancholy, resistsmadness syrupus rosaceus solutivus cum senna or syrup of roses solutive with senna college take of senna six ounces, caraway, and sweet fennel seeds, of each three drams, sprinkle them with white wine, and infuse them twodays in three pounds of the infusion of roses aforesaid, then strainit, and with two pounds of sugar boil it into a syrup culpeper it purges the body of choler and melancholy, and expelsthe relics a disease hath left behind it. The dose is from one ounceto two, you may take it in a decoction of senna, it leaves a bindingquality behind it syrupus de spina cervina or syrup of purging thorn college take of the berries of purging thorn, gathered inseptember, as thesis as you will, bruise them in a stone mortar, andpress out the juice, let the fourth writing of it evaporate away in abath, then to two pounds of it add sixteen ounces of white sugar, boil it into a syrup, which perfume with mastich, cinnamon, nutmegs, anni-seeds in fine powder, of each three drams syrups made with vinegar and honey mel anthosatum or honey of rosemary flowers college take of fresh rosemary flowers a pound, clarified honeythree pounds, mix them in a glass with a narrow mouth, set them in thesun, keep them for use culpeper it hath the same virtues with rosemary flowers, to which irefer you, only by reason of the honey it may be essaywhat cleansing mel helleboratum or honey helleborated college take of white hellebore roots bruised a pound, clear waterfourteen pounds, after three days infusion, boil it till half beconsumed, then strain it diligently, and with three pounds of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey mel mercuriale or honey of mercury college boil three pounds of the juice of mercury, with two poundsof honey to the thickness of honey culpeper it is used as an emollient in clysters mel mororum, vel diamoron or honey of mulberries college take of the juice of mulberries and blackberries, beforethey be ripe, gathered before the sun be up, of each a pound and ahalf, honey two pounds, boil them to their due thickness culpeper it is vulgarly known to be good for sore mouths, as alsoto cool inflammations there mel nuceum, alias, diacarion et dianucum or honey of nuts college take of the juice of the outward bark of green walnuts, gathered in the dog days two pounds, boil it gently till it be thick, and with one pound of honey, boil it to the thickness of honey culpeper it is a good preservative in pestilential times, aspoonful being taken as soon as you are up mel passalatum or honey of raisins college take of raisins of the sun cleansed from the stones twopounds, steep them in six pounds of warm water, the next day boil ithalf away, and press it strongly, and with two pounds of honey, let theexpressed liquor boil to its thickness culpeper it is a pretty pleasing medicine for such as are inconsumptions, and are bound in body mel rosatum commune, sive foliatum or common honey of roses college take of red roses not quite open two pounds, honey sixpounds, set them in the sun according to art mel rosatum colatum or honey of roses strained college take of the best clarified honey ten pounds, juice of freshred roses one pound, set it handessayly over the fire, and when itbegins to boil, put in four pounds of fresh red roses, the whites beingcut off.

But no erasure shall be made on account ofhis adopting or refraining from adopting the practice of any writingiculartheory of medicine or surgery, nor on account of conviction for apolitical offence out of her majesty dominions, nor on account of theconviction which ought not in the opinion of the council or committeedisqualify him from the practice of medicine or surgery 41 the council may order to be paid, out of funds at their disposal, such costs as to them may seem just, to any person against whom anycomplaint has been made which, when fully determined, is found to havebeen frivolous and vexatious 42 an entry erased by order of the council shall not be again enteredexcept by order of the council or a judge or court of competentjurisdiction 43 if the council think fit, they may direct the registrar to restore anyentry erased, without a fee, or on payment of a fee not exceeding theregistration fee, as the council may fix 44 the council is authorized to ascertain the facts of any case for theexercise of its powers of erasing and restoring by committee s 45 the act provides in detail for proceedings before such committee46 to 50 no action shall be brought against the council or committee foranything done bona fide under the act appeal from the decision toerase lies to any judge of the court of queen bench for manitoba, and such judge may make such order as to restoration or confirmationof erasure or for further inquiry, and as to costs, as to him may seemright 51 evidence - in a trial under this act the burden of proof as toregistration is on the person charged 53 the production of a certificate that the person named is dulyregistered, certified under the hand of the registrar, is sufficientevidence of registration, and his signature in the capacity ofregistrar is prima facie evidence that he is registrar without proofof signature or that he is registrar 54 the registrar is required to print and publish from time to time underthe direction of the council a correct register of the names andresidences, with medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferredby any college or body, with the date thereof, of all persons appearingon the register as existing on the day of publication 55 the register is called “the manitoba medical register;” a copy thereoffor the time being purporting to be so printed and published is primafacie evidence that the persons specified are registered s 56 in the case of any person whose name does not appear in such copy, acertified copy under the hand of the registrar of the council of theentry of the name of such person on the register is evidence thatsuch person is registered 57 the absence of the name ofany person from such copy is prima facie evidence that he is notregistered 58 practitioner rights - every person registered is entitled accordingto his qualifications to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, orany of them as the case may be, and to demand and recover full costsof suit, reasonable charges for professional aid, advice, and visits, and the cost of any medicine or other medical appliances rendered orsupplied by him to his patient 59 neglect to register - a person neglecting to register is not entitledto the rights and privileges conferred, and is liable to all penaltiesagainst unqualified or unregistered practitioners 60 unregistered persons - it is not lawful for any person not registeredto practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery for hire, gain, or hope ofreward 61 no person is entitled to receive any charge for medical or surgicaladvice or attendance, or the performance of any operation, or forany medicine which he may have prescribed or supplied, unless he beregistered, but this provision does not extend to the sale of any drugor medicine by a licensed chemist or druggist 62 no person can be appointed as a medical officer, physician, orsurgeon in the public service, or in any hospital or other charitableinstitution not supported wholly by voluntary contribution, unless hebe registered 63 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer be registered 64 definition - the expression “legally qualified medical practitioner, ”or any other words importing legal recognition as a medicalpractitioner or member of the medical profession, in any law, isconstrued to mean a person registered under this act 65 immunities - a person registered under this act is exempt from jury andinquest duty if he desire it 66 limitations - no duly registered member of the college of physiciansand surgeons is liable in an action for negligence or malpractice byreason of professional services requested or rendered, unless it becommenced within one year from the termination of such service s 67 examinations - the university of manitoba is the sole examining bodyin medicine, and the council of the university may grant to any persona certificate under the seal of the university that the council ofthe university have been satisfied that the person mentioned in thecertificate is, by way of medical education and otherwise, a properperson to be registered under this act. But such certificate shall notbe granted until the person making such application shall have givenevidence of qualification by undergoing an examination or otherwise, as the statutes of the university require, and the applicant shall inall other respects first comply with the rules and regulations of theuniversity in that behalf 68 homœopathists - until a homœopathic medical college for teachingpurposes is established in manitoba, in the case of candidates wishingto be registered as homœopathists, the full time of attendance uponlectures and hospitals required by the university statutes may be spentin such homœopathic medical colleges in the united states or europe asmay be recognized by the university of manitoba 69 every candidate who at the time of his examination signifies hiswish to be registered as a homœopathic practitioner shall not berequired to pass an examination in materia medica or therapeutics, ortheory or practice of physic, or in surgery or midwifery, except theoperative practical writings thereof, before any examiners other thanthose homœopathic examiners who shall be appointed by the university ofmanitoba 70 unlawful practices - to wilfully procure or attempt to procureregistration by false or fraudulent representation or declaration, ispunishable by a penalty not exceeding $100 to knowingly aid or assisttherein, is punishable by a penalty of from $20 to $50 for each offence73 persons not registered, for hire, gain, or the hope of reward, practising or professing to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, or advertising to give advice in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, areliable to a penalty of from $25 to $100 74 a person wilfully or falsely pretending to be a physician, doctorof medicine, surgeon, or general practitioner, or assuming a title, addition, or description other than he actually possesses and islegally entitled to, is liable to a penalty of from $10 to $50 s 75 for a person to assume a title calculated to lead people to infer thathe is registered, or is recognized by law as a physician, surgeon, or accoucheur or a licentiate in medicine, surgery, or midwifery, ispunishable with a penalty of from $25 to $100 76 on prosecution, costs may be awarded in addition to the penalty, andthe offender may be committed to the common jail for one month, unlessthe penalty and costs are sooner paid 78 prosecutor - any person may be prosecutor or complainant under the act80 limitations - prosecutions are limited to commence within six monthsafter the date of the offence 81 appeal - a person convicted under this act, giving notice of appeal, must before being released give satisfactory security for the penaltyand costs of conviction and appeal 82 stay - the council may stay proceedings in prosecutions 84 fees - the council is authorized to determine by by-law an annual fee, which is required to be paid by each member of the college the fee canbe not less than $2, nor more than $5, is payable on january 1st, andmay be recovered as a debt by the college 32 the fee for registration is subject to regulation by the council33 new brunswick medical society - all persons registered under the act constitute thenew brunswick medical society act 1881, c 19, s 2 council - there is a medical council called the council of physiciansand surgeons of new brunswick, of nine legally qualified medicalpractitioners, of not less than seven years’ standing. Four arenominated and appointed by the governor in council, and five by the newbrunswick medical society 3, 5 the secretary of the council is the registrar 7 register, evidence - the registrar is required before may 1st annuallyto print and publish in the royal gazette of the province, and suchother manner as the council shall appoint, a correct register of thenames and residences and medical titles, diplomas, and qualificationsconferred by any college or body, with the dates thereof, of allpersons appearing on the register on the 1st of january the registeris called the medical register. A copy for the time being purporting tobe so printed and published, or a certificate signed by the presidentof the council, and attested by the registrar with the corporate sealof the council, is prima facie evidence that the persons thereinspecified are registered and qualified.

Diseasesof stomach, intestine and pancreas, 1912 reed, boardman. Am jour gastro-enter , october, 1912 ewald therapie der gegenwart, 1915, p 5 reports favorable results with secretogen in one of thirteenpaper 80 harrower. Pediatrics 25:430, 1913. New york m j 118:315, 1913. Arch f verdauungskr 20:577, 1914 physiologic considerationsthroughout its clinical use, secretin has been given by mouth. Butits direct introduction into the intestine of a dog under anesthesiain even enormous quantities is without effect this fact, firstobserved by bayliss and starling, 32 was confirmed by fleig, 81 andmatuso, 36 and our personal experiments have convinced us of itstruth matuso found that ordinary secretin and that obtained fromintestinal lumen gave equally negative results large quantities ofactive secretin, moreover, acidified to 0 2 per cent hydrochloricacid, and left in the ileum for fifteen minutes, were still negative wertheimer and duvillier, 82 in a previous paper on this subject, had likewise found that acid solutions of secretin which might beconsidered more normal for the intestine than when neutral, whenintroduced into the ileum gave negative or inconstant results theyconclude that it is more likely that the pancreas does not respond tosuch minimal stimuli, than that the secretin is not absorbed 81 flieg. Arch gén de méd 191:1482, 1903 82 wertheimer and duvillier. Compt rend soc de biol 68:535, 1910 the destructive action of the digestive enzymes leads us to believethat it is in inactive form that secretin is absorbed likeepinephrin, it cannot pass through the digestive tract bayliss andstarling state that it is destroyed by one hour tryptic digestion lalou62 worked with the action on secretin of pepsin, dog gastricjuice, pancreatic juice, succus entericus and erepsin, and found ineach case a destructive effect, even almost after mixing. And afterfive minutes over 75 per cent of the activity had disappeared matuso36 introduced 30 c c of active secretin into the intestine, removed it five minutes later, and found that no activity remained other methods of administration have been tried subcutaneousinjections are practically negative matuso, 36 hallion83and intrapleural injections are likewise negligible bayliss andstarling55 83 hallion. Presse méd 20:433, 1912 starling63 finds that continued intravenous injections of secretin ina healthy dog produces after a time severe symptoms of collapse, which, he believes, are due to change in the intestinal mucous membrane causedby the entry and non-neutralization of the strongly alkaline pancreaticjuice intestinal digestion seems little affected in achylia gastrica stockton, 84 ehrman and lederer, 85 bayliss and starling32 thismay be due to other secretin stimulants as fats, or to the action ofthe nervous mechanisms meltzer86 84 stockton. In osier and mccrae modern medicine 3:19, 1914 85 ehrman and lederer. Deutsch med wchnschr 35:879, 1909 86 meltzer, s j. The factors of safety in animal structure andanimal economy, j a m a , feb 23, 1907, p 655 the destruction of secretin by human gastric juicewe have carried out in detail experiments on the digestive effect ofhuman gastric juice on secretin our results in every respect confirmthe findings of lalou, 62 who worked with commercial pepsin and doggastric juice, but are even more striking because of the much superiorquality of pure human gastric juice methods -- the human gastric juice was obtained from mr v , thegastric fistula case of our laboratory the chemical and digestivecharacters of his juice are discussed in a recent paper 87 in thedifferent experiments, different samples of gastric juice were used the secretin employed was always freshly prepared digestion wascarried out in the incubator at 38 c with the reaction of 0 4 percent acid, and the end of the period was marked by either boilingthe mixture or in the first two experiments by turning the mixturealkaline the action of the preparation, we proved, was not influencedby the method used the dogs on which the preparations were testedwere prepared for carotid blood pressure, injection into the externaljugular vein, and cannula in the pancreatic duct, essentially themethods of bayliss and starling32 being employed the preparationswere injected at body temperature after being neutralized and filtered except for the addition of normal salt solution instead of gastricjuice, the control injections of secretin were submitted to exactly thesame treatment as the other preparations 87 carlson. Am jour physiol 38:248, 1915 results -- our results are embodied in table 1 we assured ourselvesbefore beginning the series that incubation of secretin with boiledgastric juice produced no change it is to be noted in the table thateach experiment is a unit complete in itself, beginning and endingwith a control injection of secretin special attention is called tothe marked destruction that follows contact of human gastric juicewith secretin for merely one minute in experiment 4, using 1 c c of human gastric juice, the action fell to 14 drops from an originalsecretion of 21. In experiment 5, using 8 c c of gastric juice, theaction fell to 6 drops from an original secretion of 20 of interestalso is the rate at which we get complete destruction of secretin this is practically 2 hours for 2 c c with secretin giving originally110 drops experiment 2, fig 1, or 30 minutes for 5 c c with asecretin giving originally 53 drops experiment 6 these results arepractically parallel, though they were obtained with different samplesof gastric juice and in different experiments table 1 -- the destruction of secretin by human gastric juice | | secretion of pancreatic juice in drops | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- no |quan-|10 c c c| the secretin after incubation |10 c c of | tity|secretin| with human gastric juice |secretin exper-|of |control -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -control iment|gas- |-- begin-| | | | | | |-- end of | tric| ning |dig |secre-|dig |secre-|dig |secre-|experi- |juice|experi- |time, | tion |time, | tion |time, | tion | ment |used, | ment |hrs |rate |hrs |rate |hrs |rate | |c c | | | | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1 | 2 | 28 |6 | 0 |4 | 0 |2 | 0 | 16 2 | 2 | 110 |2 | 7 |1-1/2| 18 |1 | 18 | 41 3 | 2 | 40 |1 | 7 | 3/4| 7 | 1/4 | 8 | 31 4 | 1 | 21 | 1/2| 11 | 1/4| 12 | 1/60| 14 | 18 5 | 8 | 20 | 1/2| 1 | 1/4| 3 | 1/60| 6 | 18 6 | 5 | 53 | 1/2| 2 | | | | | -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- we also tried the effect of keeping the digestive time constant andvarying the amount of gastric juice employed increasing the quantityof gastric juice used increases the quantity of secretin destroyed table 2 table 2 -- experiment 7* pancreatic preparation juice drops 10 c c secretin 20 10 c c secretin digested with 0 5 c c gastric juice 15 10 c c secretin digested with 3 c c gastric juice 13 10 c c secretin digested with 10 c c gastric juice 8* the digestive time was kept constant at fifteen minutes the gastricjuice used had been diluted with stomach washings the reader will observe in table 1 that the results obtained fromthe control injection of secretin at the beginning of the experimentis uniformly greater than that obtained after several injections ofdigested secretin in view of the established fact that equal quantities of secretin cangenerally be relied on to produce results, 21 one might suggest thatthe injections of the split products of secretin have inhibited to essaydegree the action of the pancreas we can submit the data in table 3in support of this view, showing among other things that the action ofsecretin is not influenced by previous injections of inert depressorsubstances, though it by the injection of the cleavage products ofsecretin the various injections in the experiments were made at aboutfifteen-minute intervals we have carefully analyzed the reaction in blood pressure that followsthe injection of the various preparations we find no constant effect digested secretin gives a fall in blood pressure that is at times less, at times equal, and at other times greater fig 1 than that producedby the original preparation besides the bearing that it has on the therapeutic use of secretin, this destructive action of the digestive enzymes is also of primephysiologic interest failure to realize it has led to misconceptionsas to the intrinsic nature of secretin table 3 -- experiments 8 and 9 pancreatic preparations juice drops experiment 8.

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" was his next question i told him san francisco to sydney, australia, fifty-two days out "captain, " he said, "i take charge of your vessel in the name of the german imperial navy " he gave an order in german and two german sailors sprang to the flag halyards and hauled down the stars and stripes and ran up the german ensign they carefully saved the american flag and the company's burgee and took them aboard the wolf afterwards as trophies our crew meantime had been lined up and searched for weapons among the things the boarding crew brought on board was a black case containing twenty pairs of handcuffs and three large bombs to blow the vessel to pieces with they didn't need the handcuffs, however after the lieutenant had gone through the ship's papers and found out all writingiculars regarding the beluga's cargo, he had his signal men wigwag the information to the commander of the wolf, which was standing by the commander, on finding out that i had a cargo of benzine, decided not to sink the vessel immediately, but to take on board essay three hundred paper for use in their hydroplane, as their supply was getting low wolfthe german auxiliary cruiser, raider and mine layer "wolf" leaving kiel on her fifteen-month cruise, november 21st, 1916in a short while we received instructions from the wolf to proceed due east for sixty miles and wait there for them the wolf then left us, going off at right angles i learned from essay of the german sailors that there was a large steamer approaching and that the wolf would probably run along parallel with her during the night and capture her in the morning about nine-thirty that night this steamer passed us about a mile and a half off, heading to the southward and westward she was apparently a large steamer of about seven or eight thousand tons, heavily loaded she resembled in appearance the type of vessel used on the pacific coast as an oil tanker, having the high forecastle head, long bunk deck amidships, and her engines and stack away aft. She was probably a freighter of this description belonging to new zealand, bound from san francisco to australia when she came abreast of us she signalled by morse code, asking what vessel we were. But the german prize crew took good care that none of us could answer or make any signals of any kind i can use both continental and morse and had a signal lamp on board, so that if i had had an opportunity i could have warned this steamer that there was a raider about one of the first official acts by lieutenant zelasko after taking charge of my vessel was to call the cook up on the quarterdeck where he was standing and give him instructions to cook a good large meal for his men, and not to forget to have plenty of white bread to assist him in preparing this meal for the unwelcome addition to our family, he assigned one of his men as an assistant in the kitchen in the meantime the balance of his crew were searching the vessel and making an itemized list of everything that they thought would be worth transferring to the wolf i had a chance to look over this list later on and was surprised to find how complete and businesslike it was it gave the name of the article, the amount, where located, and a remark as to how best to remove it, whether in the original package, to be repacked, or carried in bulk in large canvas sacks, furnished by the wolf for that purpose this is only one incident showing the method and thoroughness with which even the minor details of their business were carried out during the evening i had a chance to get acquainted with lieutenant zelasko, the prize officer, and found him a very decent chap indeed he, and all the rest of the wolf's officers, excepting the commander and the artillery lieutenant, were members of the imperial marine, or naval reserve, men that in peace time commanded and served as officers in the merchant service, like myself in fact, i found that lieutenant zelasko had served writing of his time as able-bodied seaman on the american ship roanoke, a vessel that i had been in essay years before he had the second class iron cross which he had won at antwerp lieutenant zelasko assured me on his word of honour that my family would receive nothing but the best of care possible under the circumstances on board the wolf in fact, after finding out that the wolf was manned by ex-merchant marine officers and men, my fears for the safety of my wife and little girl subsided greatly my wife herself cheered up a great deal after hearing this, thinking that people from our own walk of life could not be as barbarous as we had been led to believe early in the morning of the tenth we arrived at the position where we were to wait for the wolf here we hove to, and the prize crew, assisted by my sailors, who were forced to do all the work pertaining to the handling of the ship, took off the hatches and took on deck three hundred paper of benzine, ready to be transported to the wolf when she showed up during all this time there were always five or six guards or sentries posted at various positions around the ship, and also the balance of the prize crew always wore their side arms, whether they were working or not the navigating officer of zelasko's prize crew and the bo'swain were both american navigators, one having been, prior to the war, master of a sailing vessel plying on the atlantic coast, and the other a chief mate, also in sail, on the atlantic at the outbreak of the war both resigned their positions and went home to lend kaiser bill a hand these fellows received eighteen marks per month and have a rating of only "over matrosa, " or just one step higher than that of common sailor several months later, after we had got better acquainted, i asked this ex-american skipper if he did not think it rather a scurvy trick to sail as master on american ships during peace times and as soon as war was declared to leave america and help sink the very class of ships that he had hitherto made his living on he replied by saying that at the time he resigned and went home to enlist america was not in the war, but even had she been, he would have gone just the same from conversations i had with other ex-american seamen, i am led to believe that at the outbreak of hostilities the german consuls at the port where their vessels hailed from ordered these men to resign and go home to the fatherland i also believe that their fare and expenses were paid there are thesis, thesis paper similar to this, and i believe it would be a good thing for the american shipowners to remember when employing officers and captains to man their vessels after the war is over the german prize crew made a great fuss over juanita, she being quite a novelty to them, and i am sure that she had the time of her life nobody on board the wolf had seen a woman or a child for nearly nine months my wife and little girl were the first woman and child they had taken prisoner on july 11th, early in the morning, the wolf picked us up again it seems that the steamer we saw got away from them the wolf put four large life-boats on the water and took off essay three hundred paper of benzine and all the provisions and ship's stores we had on board the beluga when the vessel was taken charge of by the german prize officer, he told me that i would be allowed to take only a few absolute necessities aboard the wolf when i was transferred. But later, on the 11th, when the wolf picked us up, commander nerger sent over word that i was to be allowed to take everything i wanted unfortunately the permission came almost too late, because by this time the german crew had ransacked my quarters very thoroughly and thesis articles that i would have taken with me for the comfort of my family were gone weeks later essay of these were recovered for instance, i had a pair of rubber-soled, leather-topped yachting shoes essay weeks after joining the wolf i noticed a man with these shoes on his feet i called the attention of one of the officers to it and told him that they were formerly my property the following morning those shoes were just outside my stateroom door, nicely polished among the things i took on the wolf was the wife's sewing machine, which proved of great value later on, as she had to make under and over garments for both herself and nita my nautical instruments, books and charts were taken from me, but i was told that they would be returned to me on my arrival in gerthesis at 1:20 we got into the boats and said a last farewell to the poor little beluga, and she did look little in comparison with this big black brute of a raider as we were being rowed over, the wolf's rails were lined with grinning faces, and not one of them that i could see had the least trace of sympathy not that i wanted sympathy for myself, but it seemed strange to me, at the time, that out of over three hundred german sailors and officers there was not one whose face showed any sympathy for the position a woman and little child were in we climbed on board by means of a jacob's ladder, myself first with nita on my back, and my wife next thesis offered to lend her a hand, but she managed to make it without any help there was a certain satisfaction in this, as afterwards i found out that the germans anticipated a lot of trouble in getting her aboard, as there was quite a bit of sea running on arriving on deck we were met by the chief officer, captain schmell, whose first words were, "tell your wife and little girl that they have nothing to fear, that we are not the huns you probably think we are " he took us aft under the poop and showed us an ex-storeroom which essay men were cleaning out for our use this room was in the centre of the prisoners' quarters and had absolutely no ventilation, and there were negroes, indians and various other nationalities passing up and down to the hell hole, before the door, in various stages of décolleté, to say the least the chief told me that we three could have this room together, or my wife and child could have a more comfortable room on the berth deck amidships, but that i would have to remain down below and that i would be allowed to visit my family two hours daily my wife would not hear of this latter arrangement, saying that we would live in a pig-sty together rather than be separated just then commander nerger came along and spoke to us, saying that he was very sorry to find that the beluga had a woman and child on board, and had he known that such was the case he would have passed right on. But that once he had shown himself to be a raider, to protect himself he would have to keep us prisoners until such time when he could land us at a place where it would not jeopardise the safety of his vessel or crew.