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Opium, 0 02 per cent. Ethyl alcohol, 0 10 per cent. Water to 100 writings ”it will be noticed that the composition claimed for number “3” isessentially similar to that claimed for chloron it differs fromchloron in that the amounts of essay of the constituents are essaywhatgreater, and in that, like chlorax, it contains essay tincture of opium the a m a chemical laboratory reports that the free chlorin in aspecimen of number “3” was 0 024 gm in 100 c c and the total active “available” chlorin 0 173 gm per hundred c c , or about 50 per cent of the claimed amount the examination indicates that number “3” is ofunreliable composition the chlorine products company, inc , submittedno clinical evidence for number “3” to which it refers as “our syphilisremedy ” it stated that two physicians had used the preparation “withgood results, ” and admitted that “the company requires further evidencebefore pushing it ”the council declared “chloron, ” “chlorax” and “number ‘3’” in conflictwith the rules governing admission to new and nonofficial remedies allare of unreliable composition conflict with rule 1 the therapeuticclaims made for the preparations are not substantiated by acceptableevidence and are unwarranted and misleading chloron is inferior as anantiseptic to the well-known surgical solution of chlorinated soda onaccount of its low chlorin content and uncontrolled reaction thereis no warrant for the claim that chlorax is useful in the treatmentof “kidney conditions, ” “diabetes, ” “acute infections, ” “blooddicrasias, ” “lithemias and rheumatism, ” and “nervous conditions, ” noris there warrant for the claim that “number ‘3’” is a remedy for thepurification of the blood or a “syphilis remedy” conflict with rule 6 the names of these pharmaceutical mixtures are not descriptive of theircomposition conflict with rule 8 all three preparations are irrational no evidence has been furnishedthat the lithium salt is of value in the mixtures it is not rationalto combine an active chlorin preparation and a mercury salt in onemixture, nor is there evidence that the addition of opium to thepreparations proposed for internal use is of value or rational experimentation with number “3” as a “syphilis remedy” is to beseverely condemned in that those on whom it is used will in themeantime be deprived of efficient medication conflict with rule10 -- from reports of council on pharmacy and chemistry, 1919, p 70 elarson omitted from n n r report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrythe council has authorized publication of the following reportannouncing the omission of elarson from new and nonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary elarson, now sold by the winthrop chemical company, inc , was formerlysold in the united states by the bayer co , inc it was admitted to newand nonofficial remedies in 1914 the circular issued by the winthrop chemical co contains severalstatements markedly at variance with the results of an investigationmade, at the request of fischer, by joachimoglu arch f exper path u pharmakol 78:1914 the circular states that elarson containsabout 13 per cent arsenic joachimoglu found from 10 8 to 11 1 percent to be present the circular states further. “the fact that elarson represents a lipoid-like chemical combination of arsenic has an important bearing upon its absorption and utilization in the system there is good reason to believe that when arsenic is administered in a stable, lipoid-like combination, as in elarson, it is more readily taken up by the cells and more completely utilized than when given in the customary manner ” “as regards the behavior of elarson in the system, it has been shown that its active constituent, chlorarseno-behenol, is almost completely absorbed in this form, probably as a chlor-behenolate of sodium or potassium ”as a matter of fact, joachimoglu found that very little arsenic wasabsorbed when elarson was given to dogs and rabbits. Most of it wasrecovered from the feces. Only traces were found in the liver andkidneys and none in the blood and brain the absence from the latterorgans shows that the lipoid solubility does not obtain in the body itis claimed in the circular that elarson has the advantage over fowlersolution “in that it is free from any irritating action upon thegastro-intestinal tract”. It is stated that as thesis as sixty tabletshave been given to dogs daily without any toxic effects joachimoglu, on the other hand, found powdered elarson to be very irritating tothe gastro-intestinal tract.

Others are proving to be of value in an extremelylimited number of conditions the sooner writers of textbooks realizethis fact and enter into the spirit of the new era, the better forthe public and for scientific medicine -- editorial from the journala m a , may 27, 1916 thomas webster edgar tired rabbits for diabetes. Ring-tailed monkeys for sex stimulationduring the last two or three years the journal has received inquiriesregarding one thomas webster edgar, m d , of new york city, first, relative to his alleged treatment for diabetes and more recently abouthis “monkey gland” treatment for sex stimulation here is one from aphysician in washington. “have you any knowledge of the efficacy of a serum made from the pancreas of rabbits for the relief or cure of diabetes?.

To the large percentage of protein that is digestible and the palatability of alfalfa ” “ table showing pounds of elements removed from the soil by one ton of crop alfalfa wheat potash 49 79 12 52 phosphoric acid 8 27 9 08 lime 43 51 2 95 nitrogen 44 01 22 30” “ the abundance of muscle and bone producing material in alfalfa makes this crop especially good ”thus estimates of the value of a farm crop and cattle fodder are madeto do service as testimonials to its therapeutic merit for humanbeings!. has the “patent medicine” promoter ever dared to insult theintelligence of his patrons by a cruder absurdity?. yet it is not to thenontechnical and unscientific public, but to a profession presumablyscientifically trained in pharmacology and therapeutics that thisconcern presumes to offer its fodder tincture on the basis of testimonyto the agricultural value of the fodder plant alfatone is a worthless alcoholic cordial the audacity of the attemptto promote its sale by a discourse on the merits of a well-known fodderplant is the sole reason for devoting any attention to it it isrecommended that alfatone be held ineligible for new and nonofficialremedies, and that this report be published editorial note -- what a comment on american medicine that a concerncan even contemplate the possibility of making a commercial successof the sale of such a silly nostrum as alfatone!. and yet, when oneremembers that a proprietary in which oats constitutes one ingredient “pas-avena” for years has been advertised to physicians andpresumably prescribed by them, it is not altogether inexplicable thatbusiness men should get the impression that the medical professionis “easy” enough to “fall for” anything in the line of proprietarymixtures perhaps we may look forward to being offered proprietariesbased on other cheap and well-known fodder plants tincture of timothyhay, blue grass tonic, cornhusk wine!. why not?. the enterprisingcompanies that may put them out can easily publish tables to showthe digestible nutrients in each and indubitable testimony can befurnished to prove the excellence of any of them as stock feed if apitchforkful of timothy hay makes a good fattening ration for a growingsteer why should not a teaspoonful of tincture of timothy hay make a“reconstructive tonic and nutrient” dose for a man?. if an arm load ofthistles carduus makes a luscious food for equus asinus why shouldnot a pinch of thistle in alcohol and water be a good “tonic”?. greatare the possibilities!. they are limited only by the gullibility of themedical profession and the public certain it is that essay proprietarymanufacturers are firmly convinced that no combination can be toopreposterous to be worth trying on the medical profession -- from thejournal a m a , aug 7, 1915 articles refused recognition report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrybelow appear abstracts of the council actions on articles refusedrecognition which were not deemed of sufficient importance to requirelengthy reports uricsoluricsol is marketed by the uricsol chemical company, formerly of losangeles, now of boston regarding its composition only vague statementsare made in an advertising pamphlet it is promised that the formulawill be sent to physicians on request such a request from a physicianelicited the following statement. “uricsol is a non-irritating, alkaline solution, containing lithium citrate, acid citric and potassium nitrate, together with a saline laxative in the form of glycero sodium phosphate, with vegetable tonics added ”the association laboratory has made an examination of uricsol todetermine its composition and reports as follows. Laboratory reporta trade package purchased in march, 1915, from a wholesale drug housewas labeled. “uricsol rheumatic remedy, uric acid solvent, kidney and liver stimulant, manufactured by the uricsol chemical co , los angeles, cal ”this package was wrapped in a circular entitled “the great californiaremedy-- uricsol ” the preparation is a viscid, slightly turbid lightbrown liquid, with a faintly aromatic odor and a salty, bittertaste the diluted solution is acid in reaction toward litmus andphenolphthalein and alkaline toward methyl orange qualitative tests showed a presence of phosphate, citrate, nitrate, sodium, glycerin, and a small amount of lithium in aqueous solution besides these a small amount of essay organic, nonalkaloidal substancewas found, which from its bitter taste suggested gentian from thequalitative tests it appeared that the phosphate was the predominatingingredient and accordingly a phosphate determination was made theresults, calculated to sodium phosphate, u s p , indicated thepresence of 64 20 gm per 100 c c , held in solution by citric acid andsodium nitrate uricsol evidently is a solution containing a large amount of sodiumphosphate with small amounts of lithium, nitrate, citric acid andglycerin, with probably essay vegetable extract in general uricsol is similar to the once widely exploited proprietary“melachol, ” which has been frequently imitated a preparationessentially identical is in the united states pharmacopeia, under thetitle “compound solution of sodium phosphate ”the uricsol company calls its preparation “ the latest word in the treatment of rheumatism and that allied group of ailments which is caused by an excess of uric acid ”hay fever, bronchial asthma and neuritis are conditions in which it isrecommended the claim is made that “uricsol quickly controls vasomotor rhinitis and eliminates such conditions from the system ” “in fact, it will correct faulty metabolism ”to a few practitioners of an older generation the pharmacologic basisof a remedy for rheumatism was sufficiently defined by saying that itincreased the solubility of uric acid or affected it in essay way thistheory is obsolete. There is not, and never was, any reliable evidenceon which to base the theory that rheumatism is in any way caused byuric acid the exploitation of uricsol as a “uric acid solvent” ismerely another illustration of the way in which nostrum manufacturersplay on disproved theories of course the claim that sodium phosphatehas any writingicular power to control vasomotor rhinitis, hay fever, asthma, and to correct faulty metabolism is foolish to summarize. Uricsol is a mixture of well-known drugs, marketed withfalse claims as to therapeutic action, with misleading and meaninglessstatements as to composition and under a name which invites uncriticalprescribing uricsol is held ineligible to inclusion in new andnonofficial remedies jubolthe following ridiculous statements are addressed, not to the laity, but to the medical profession. Do you suffer from constipation-- hemorrhoids-- enteritis-- mucous discharge-- pituita-- acidity of the stomach-- vertigo-- sick headache-- disturbed sleep-- insomnia-- sallow complexion-- coated tongue-- offensive breath-- fatigue and depression-- boils-- pimples?. “one of these symptoms alone shows that there is defective or insufficient function of the intestines, even if the stools are regular “excrements remain too long in the intestine and set up fermentation the harmful poisons and ptomains which they produce are re-absorbed by the blood and poison the whole system “the intestines must be cleared and re-educated with jubol “jubolise your intestines ”jubol tablets are sold in the united states by geo j wallau, inc , new york, and are said to be prepared by j l chatelain, paris, france the following incomplete and nonquantitative “formula” isfurnished. “ compounded chiefly !.

Being snuffed up in thenose, it helps spasmus cynicus, which is a wrying the mouth aside;it helps noise in the ears being dropped into them, it provokesthe menses, and helps the biting of venomous beasts. It is a mostgallant oil to strengthen the body, the back being anointed with it;strengthens the muscles, they being chafed with it. Helps head-ache, the forehead being rubbed with it moschelæum, or, oil of musk college take two nutmegs, musk one dram, indian leaf or mace, spikenard, costus, mastich, of each six drams, styrax calamitis, cassialignea, myrrh, saffron, cinnamon, cloves, carpobalsamum or cubebs, bdellium, of each two drams, pure oil three pounds, wine three ounces, bruise them as you ought to do, mix them, and let them boil easily, till the wine be consumed, the musk being mixed according to art afterit is strained culpeper it is exceeding good against all diseases of cold, especially those of the stomach, it helps diseases of the sides, theybeing anointed with it, the stranguary, cholic, and vices of thenerves, and afflictions of the reins oleum nardinum or, oil of nard college take of spikenard three ounces, marjoram two ounces, woodof aloes, calamus aromaticus, elecampane, cypress, bay leaves, indianleaf or mace, squinanth, cardamoms, of each one ounce and a half, bruise them all grossly, and steep them in water and wine, of eachfourteen ounces, oil of sesamin, or oil of olives, four pounds andan half, for one day. Then perfect the oil by boiling it gently in adouble vessel oleum populeum nicholaus college take of fresh poplar buds three pounds, wine four pounds, common oil seven pounds two ounces, beat the poplar buds very well, then steep them seven days in the oil and wine, then boil them in adouble vessel till the wine be consumed, if you infuse fresh buds onceor twice before you boil it, the medicine will be the stronger, thenpress out the oil and keep it culpeper it is a fine cool oil, but the ointment called by thatname which follows hereafter is far better ointments more simple unguentum album, or, white ointment college take of oil of roses nine ounces, ceruss washed inrose-water and diligently sifted, three ounces, white wax two ounces, after the wax is melted in the oil, put in the ceruss, and make itinto an ointment according to art, add two drams of camphire, madeinto powder with a few drops of oil of sweet almonds, so will it becamphorated culpeper it is a fine cooling, drying ointment, eases pains, anditching in wounds and ulcers, and is an hundred times better withcamphire than without it unguentum egyptiacum college take of verdigris finely powdered, five writings, honeyfourteen writings, sharp vinegar seven writings, boil them to a justthickness, and a reddish colour culpeper it cleanses filthy ulcers and fistulas forcibly, and notwithout pain, it takes away dead and proud flesh, and dries unguentum anodynum or, an ointment to ease pain college take of oil of white lilies, six ounces, oil of dill, andchamomel, of each two ounces, oil of sweet almonds one ounce, duckgrease, and hen grease, of each two ounces, white wax three ounces, mix them according to art culpeper its use is to assuage pains in any writing of the body, especially such as come by inflammations, whether in wounds or tumours, and for that it is admirable unguentum ex apio or, ointment of smallage college take of the juice of smallage one pound, honey nine ounces, wheat flower three ounces, boil them to a just thickness culpeper it is a very fine, and very gentle cleanser of wounds andulcers liniment of gum elemi college take of gum elemi, turpentine of the fir-tree, of each oneounce and an half, old sheep suet cleansed two ounces, old hoggrease cleansed one ounce. Mix them, and make them into an ointmentaccording to art culpeper it gently cleanses and fills up an ulcer with flesh, itbeing of a mild nature, and friendly to the body unguentum aureum college take of yellow wax half a pound, common oil two pounds, turpentine two ounces, pine rozin, colophonia, of each one ounce and anhalf, frankincense, mastich, of each one ounce, saffron one dram, firstmelt the wax in the oil, then the turpentine being added, let them boiltogether. Having done boiling, put in the rest in fine powder, letthe saffron be the last and by diligent stirring, make them into anointment according to art basilicon, the greater college take of white wax, pine rozin, heifer suet, greek pitch, turpentine, olibanum, myrrh, of each one ounce, oil five ounces, powder the olibanum and myrrh, and the rest being melted, make it intoan ointment according to art basilicon, the less college take of yellow wax, fat rozin, greek pitch, of each half apound, oil nine ounces. Mix them together, by melting them according toart culpeper both this and the former, heat, moisten, and digest, procure matter in wounds, i mean brings the filth or corrupted bloodfrom green wounds. They clense and ease pain ointment of bdellium college take of bdellium six drams, euphorbium, sagapen, of eachfour drams, castoreum three drams, wax fifteen drams, oil of elder orwall-flowers, ten drams, the bdellium, and sagapen being dissolved inwater of wild rue, let the rest be united by the heat of a bath unguentum de calce or, ointment of chalk college take of chalk washed, seven times at least, half a pound, wax three ounces, oil of roses one pound, stir them all togetherdiligently in a leaden mortar, the wax being first melted by a gentlefire in a sufficient quantity of the prescribed oil culpeper it is exceeding good in burnings and scaldings unguentum dialthæ or, ointment of marsh-mallows college take of common oil four pounds, mussilage of marsh-mallowroots, linseed, and fenugreek seed two pounds. Boil them together tillthe watery writing of the mussilage be consumed, then add wax half a pound, rozin three ounces, turpentine an ounce, boil them to the consistenceof an ointment, but let the mussilage be prepared of a pound of freshroots bruised, and half a pound of each of the seeds steeped, andboiled in eight pounds of spring water, and then pressed out see thecompound unguentum diapompholygos college take of oil of nightshade sixteen ounces, white wax, washed, ceruss, of each four drams, lead burnt and washed, pompholixprepared, of each two ounces, pure frankincense one ounce. Bring theminto the form of an ointment according to art culpeper this much differing from the former, you shall have thatinserted at latter end, and then you may use which you please unguentum enulatum or, ointment of elecampane college take of elecampane roots boiled in vinegar, bruised andpulped, one pound, turpentine washed in their decoction, new wax, ofeach two ounces, old hog grease salted ten ounces, old oil fourounces, common salt one ounce, add the turpentine to the grease, wax, and oil, being melted, as also the pulp and salt being finely powdered, and so make it into an ointment according to art unguentum enulatum cum mercurio or, ointment of elecampane with quick-silver, college is made of the former ointment, by adding two ounces ofquick-silver, killed by continual stirring, not only with spittle, orjuice of lemons, but with all the turpentine kept for that intent, andwriting of the grease, in a stone mortar culpeper my opinion of this ointment, is briefly this. It wasinvented for the itch, without quick-silver it will do no good, withquick-silver it may do harm unguentum laurinum commune or, ointment of bays common college take of bay leaves bruised one pound, bay berries bruisedhalf a pound, cabbage leaves four ounces, neat-foot oil five pounds, bullock suet two pounds, boil them together, and strain them, that soit may be made into an ointment according to art unguentum de minie sive rubrum camphora or, ointment of red lead college take of oil of roses one pound and an half, red lead threeounces, litharge two ounces, ceruss one ounce and an half, tutty threedrams, camphire two drams, wax one ounce and an half, make it into anointment according to art, in a pestle and mortar made of lead culpeper this ointment is as drying as a man shall usually readof one, and withal cooling, therefore good for sores, and such as aretroubled with defluctions unguentum e nicotiona, seu peto or, ointment of tobacco college take of tobacco leaves bruised, two pounds, steep them awhole night in red wine, in the morning boil it in fresh hog grease, diligently washed, one pound, till the wine be consumed, strain it, andadd half a pound of juice of tobacco, rozin four ounces, boil it to theconsumption of the juice, adding towards the end, round birthwort rootsin powder, two ounces, new wax as much as is sufficient to make it intoan ointment according to art culpeper it would take a whole summer day to write the writingicularvirtues of this ointment, and my poor genius is too weak to give itthe hundredth writing of its due praise. It cures tumours, imposthumes, wounds, ulcers, gun-shot, stinging with nettles, bees, wasps, hornets, venomous beasts, wounds made with poisoned arrows, &c unguentum nutritum, seu trifarmacum college take of litharge of gold finely powdered, half a pound, vinegar one pound, oil of roses two pounds, grind the litharge ina mortar, pouring to it essaytimes oil, essaytimes vinegar, till bycontinual stirring, the vinegar do no more appear, and it come to awhitish ointment culpeper it is of a cooling, drying nature, good for itching ofwounds, and such like deformities of the skin unguentum ophthalmicum or, an ointment for the eyes college take of bole-ammoniac washed in rose water, one ounce, lapis calaminaris washed in eye bright water, tutty prepared, of eachtwo drams, pearls in very fine powder half a dram, camphire half ascruple, opium five grains, fresh butter washed in plantain water, asmuch as is sufficient to make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it is exceeding good to stop hot rheums that fall downinto the eyes, the eyelids being but anointed with it unguentum ex oxylapatho or, ointment of sharp-pointed dock college take of the roots of sharp-pointed dock boiled in vinegaruntil they be soft, and then pulped, brimstone washed in juice oflemons, of each one ounce and an half, hog grease often washed injuice of scabious, half a pound, unguentum populeon washed in juice ofelecampane, half an ounce. Make them into an ointment in a mortar culpeper it is a wholeessay, though troubleessay medicine for scabsand itch unguentum e plumbo or, ointment of lead college take of lead burnt according to art, litharge, of each twoounces, ceruss, antimony, of each one ounce, oil of roses as much as issufficient. Make it into an ointment according to art culpeper take it one time with another, it will go neer to do moreharm than good unguentum pomatum college take of fresh hog grease three pounds, fresh sheep suetnine ounces, pomewater pared and cut, one pound and nine ounces, damaskrose-water six ounces, the roots of orris florentine grossly bruisedsix drams, boil them in balneo mariæ till the apples be soft, thenstrain it, but press it not and keep it for use. Then warm it a littleagain and wash it with fresh rose-water, adding to each pound twelvedrops of oil of lignum rhodium culpeper its general use is, to soften and supple the roughness ofthe skin, and take away the chops of the lips, hands, face, or otherwritings unguentum potabile college take of butter without salt, a pound and an half, spermaceti, madder, tormentil roots, castoreum, of each half an ounce:boil them as you ought in a sufficient quantity of wine, till the winebe consumed, and become an ointment culpeper i know not what to make of it unguentum resinum college take of pine rozin, or rozin of the pine-tree, of thepurest turpentine, yellow wax washed, pure oil, of each equal writings:melt them into an ointment according to art culpeper it is as pretty a cerecloth for a new sprain as most is, and cheap unguentum rosatum or, ointment of roses college take of fresh hog grease cleansed a pound, fresh redroses half a pound, juice of the same three ounces, make it into anointment according to art culpeper it is of a fine cooling nature, exceeding useful in allgallings of the skin, and frettings, accompanied with choleric humours, angry pushes, tetters, ringworms, it mitigates diseases in the headcoming of heat, as also the intemperate heat of the stomach and liver desiccativum rubrum or, a drying red ointment college take of the oil of roses omphacine a pound, white wax fiveounces, which being melted and put in a leaden mortar, put in the earthof lemnos or bole-ammoniac, lapis calaminaris, of each four ounces, litharge of gold, ceruss, of each three ounces, camphire one dram, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it binds and restrains fluxes of humours unguentum e solano or, ointment of nightshade college take of juice of nightshade, litharge washed, of eachfive ounces, ceruss washed eight ounces, white wax seven ounces, frankincense in powder ten drams, oil of roses often washed in watertwo pounds, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it was invented to take away inflammations from wounds, and to keep people from scratching of them when they are almost well or, ointment of tutty college take of tutty prepared two ounces, lapis calaminaris oftenburnt and quenched in plantain water an ounce, make them, being finelypowdered, into an ointment, with a pound and an half of ointment ofroses culpeper it is a cooling, drying ointment, appropriated to theeyes, to dry up hot and salt humours that flow down thither, theeyelids being anointed with it valentia scabiosæ college take of the juice of green scabious, pressed out with ascrew, and strained through a cloth, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, heat the hog grease in a stone mortar, not grind it, putting in the juice by degrees for the more commodious mixture andtincture, afterwards set it in the sun in a convenient vessel, so asthe juice may overtop the grease, nine days being passed, pour off thediscoloured juice, and beat it again as before, putting in fresh juice, set it in the sun again five days, which being elapsed, beat it again, put in more juice, after fifteen days more, do so again, do so fivetimes, after which, keep it in a glass, or glazed vessel tapsivalentia college take of the juice of mullen, hog grease, of each as muchas you will, let the grease be cleansed and cut in pieces, and beat itwith the juice, pressed and strained as you did the former ointment, then keep it in a convenient vessel nine or ten days, then beat ittwice, once with fresh juice, until it be green, and the second timewithout juice beaten well, pouring off what is discoloured, and keep itfor use tapsimel college take of the juice of celandine and mullen, of each onewriting, clarified honey, two writings, boil them by degrees till the juicebe consumed, adding the physician prescribing vitriol, burnt alum, burnt ink, and boil it again to an ointment according to art ointments more compound unguentum agrippa college take of briony roots two pounds, the roots of wildcucumbers one pound, squills half a pound, fresh english orris roots, three ounces, the roots of male fern, dwarf elder, water caltrops, oraaron, of each two ounces, bruise them all, being fresh, and steep themsix or seven days in four pounds of old oil, the whitest, not rank, then boil them and press them out, and in the oil melt fifteen ouncesof white wax, and make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it purges exceedingly, and is good to anoint the belliesof such as have dropsies, and if there be any humour or flegm in anywriting of the body that you know not how to remove provided the writing benot too tender you may anoint it with this. But yet be not too busywith it, for i tell you plainly it is not very safe unguentum amarum or, a bitter ointment college take of oil of rue, savin, mints, wormwood, bitter almonds, of each one ounce and an half, juice of peach flowers and leaves, andwormwood, of each half an ounce, powder of rue, mints, centaury theless, gentian, tormentil, of each one dram, the seeds of coleworts, thepulp of colocynthis, of each two drams, aloes hepatic, three drams, meal of lupines half an ounce, myrrh washed in grass water a dram andan half, bull gall an ounce and an half, with a sufficient quantityof juice of lemons, and an ounce and an half of wax, make it into anointment according to art unguentum apostolorum or, ointment of the apostles college take of turpentine, yellow wax, ammoniacum, of eachfourteen drams, long birthwort roots, olibanum, bdellium, of each sixdrams, myrrh, gilbanum, of each half an ounce, opopanax, verdigris, ofeach two drams, litharge nine drams, oil two pounds, vinegar enough todissolve the gums, make it into an ointment according to art culpeper it consumes corrupt and dead flesh, and makes flesh softwhich is hard, it cleanses wounds, ulcers, and fistulas, and restoresflesh where it is wanting unguentum catapsoras college take of ceruss washed in purslain water, then in vinegarwherein wild rhadish roots have been steeped and pressed out, lapiscalaminaris, chalcitis, of each six drams, burnt lead, goat blood, of each half an ounce, quick-silver sublimated an ounce, the juiceof houseleek, nightshade, plantain, of each two ounces, hog greasecleansed three pounds, oil of violets, poppies, mandrakes, of each anounce. First let them sublimate and exungia, then the oils, juices, andpowders, be mixed, and so made into an ointment according to art unguentum citrinum or, a citron ointment college take of borax an ounce, camphire a dram, white coral halfan ounce, alum plume an ounce, umbilicus marinus, tragacanth, whitestarch, of each three drams, crystal, dentalis utalis, olibanum, niter, white marble, of each two drams, gersa serpentaria an ounce, cerusssix ounces, hog grease not salted, a pound and an half, goat suetprepared, an ounce and an half, hen fat two ounces and an half powder the things as you ought to do both together, and by themselves, melt the fats being cleansed in a stone vessel, and steep in them twocitrons of a mean bigness cut in bits, in a warm bath, after a wholeweek strain it, and put in the powders by degrees, amongst which letthe camphire and borax be the last, stir them, and bring them into theform of an ointment unguentum martiatum college take of fresh bay leaves three pounds, garden rue twopounds and an half, marjoram two pounds, mints a pound, sage, wormwood, costmary, bazil, of each half a pound, sallad oil twenty pounds, yellowwax four pounds, malaga wine two pounds, of all of them being bruised, boiled, and pressed out as they ought, make an ointment according toart culpeper it is a great strengthener of the head, it being anointedwith it. As also of all the writings of the body, especially the nerves, muscles, and arteries unguentum mastichinum or, an ointment of mastich college take of the oil of mastich, wormwood, and nard, of each anounce, mastich, mints, red roses, red coral, cloves, cinnamon, wood ofaloes, squinanth, of each a dram, wax as much as is sufficient to makeit into an ointment according to art culpeper this is like the former, and not a whit inferior to it;it strengthens the stomach being anointed with it, restores appetiteand digestion before it was called a stomach ointment unguentum neapolitanum college take of hog grease washed in juice of sage a pound, quick-silver strained through leather, four ounces, oil of bays, chamomel, and earthworms, of each two ounces, spirit of wine an ounce, yellow wax two ounces, turpentine washed in juice of elecampane threeounces, powder of chamepitys and sage, of each two drams, make theminto an ointment according to art culpeper a learned art to spoil people. Hundreds are bound to cursesuch ointments, and those that appoint them unguentum nervinum college take of cowslips with the flowers, sage, chamepitys, rosemary, lavender, bay with the berries, chamomel, rue, smallage, melilot with the flowers, wormwood, of each a handful, mints, betony, pennyroyal, parsley, centaury the less, st john wort, of each ahandful, oil of sheep or bullock feet, five pounds, oil of spike, half an ounce, sheep or bullock suet, or the marrow of either, twopounds.

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“how to make money as well as reputation in the treatment of all chronic ailments and all types, forms and sequella of venereal diseases ”the “eli ‘vim’ restorative” is said to be a “tonic aphrodisiac ” the“action” of the product is to “arouse sexual ardor and desire influxblood supply to the genital organs ” a postscript to the “guide” urgesphysicians. “if you do not already use intravenous serums, by all means get an outfit, if for no other reason than to meet the popular demand ”a “special note” in the “confidential guide” advises physicians who“have to deal with hysteria” to “write the author of this guide, whowill explain by personal letter a method of cooperation by which suchconvulsions may be at once and forever stopped there will be $100for you from every case treated ” one physician wrote to the “author ofthis guide”-- eli h dunn, m d -- asking for further information on thistreatment for hysteria he received in reply two letters both signedeli h dunn. One was to be shown to the patient, the other was for thedoctor own information the letter for the patient to see describedthe marvelous effects of “dunn intravenous and restorative treatment”in hysteria and recommended it “with the utmost confidence in everycase able to pay you the fee commensurate with the service you render ”then followed these two paragraphs. “the cost of the treatment when administered by yourself is $300 cash with orders which includes one complete outfit and technique for administering “should you call me personally in consultation an additional fee of $150 per diem covering the time i am away from my kansas city office. Fees to be collected and held until i arrive ”the letter that was intended only for the doctor eye declared. “you are to have $100 of the fee and $50 of the per diem ”it explained that the “complete outfit” referred to in the “patientletter” would “consist in writing of a tube of intravenous medication” anddoses of “restorative capsules” and “eli 606 capsules ”eli h dunn seems to have had a essaywhat varied and spectacular career after being graduated in 1885 he apparently started practice in orion, ill during the nineties he was practicing at elma, iowa, and about1900 he seems to have moved to kansas city, mo during 1906 and 1908, he also had an additional office at denver, col about this time he wasexploiting “dunn uterine evacuant” which was “a strictly legitimate”product which could “be injected within the uterus with perfect safetyand immediate effect ” this stuff was advertised both from the kansascity and the denver offices the “personal column” of a kansas citypaper in 1910 carried the message to “ladies” that “dr dunn” was a“regular physician for women only, ” dunn violation of the postal lawsin 1911 and of the federal food and drugs act in 1912 need not be goneinto at this time the journal would feel like apologizing for devoting space to such apreposterous scheme were it not for the fact that physicians, beinghuman, essaytimes “fall for” preposterous schemes essay, we know, havenibbled at dunn bait. Others may do so the gross commercialism thatpermeates the advertising matter sent out by dunn again emphasizesthe fact that the fad for intravenous medication offers an attractivefield for those who would exploit our profession -- from the journala m a , nov 22, 1919 glover cancer serumscores of letters have reached-- and are reaching-- the journal officesimilar in effect to the following. “i am enclosing ‘literature’ received from the ‘t j glover research laboratory ’ though purporting to come from toronto, where the $25 00 are to be sent, if you please, the envelope bears the 448 new york postmark ”the above is from new jersey while the two following are from michiganand illinois, respectively. “have you any information in regard to this writingy and his treatment for cancer?. this is the first i have heard of any such work having been done one wonders if it is presented in good faith or if the money god has overcome the gentleman scientific spirit ” “is this just one more of them?.