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5 Paragraph Essay Sample


They break the stone being appliedin like manner to the region of the bladder. Help the rickets, beingapplied to the belly and sides. Applied to the navel, they give presentease to the fits of the mother. They take away cold aches in the jointsapplied to them. Boiled, the liquor absolutely and speedily cures scabsand itch. Neither is there any better salve in the world for woundsthan may be made of it. For it cleanses, fetches out the filth thoughit lie in the bones, brings up the flesh from the bottom, and all thisit doth speedily. It cures wounds made with poisoned weapons, and forthis clusius brings thesis experiences too tedious here to relate it is an admirable thing for carbuncles and plague-sores, inferiorto none. Green wounds ’twill cure in a trice.

Extensivepericardial adhesions liver and kidneys congested 81 see two paper 5 paragraph essay sample of judicial hanging by wilkie, same journal, 1881, xvi , p 275 82 porter. Archiv laryngol , new york, 1880, i , p 142 - redemierhung drop five feet pulse beat rapidly a few minutes, then lessenedin frequency and stopped beating in fifteen minutes during thistime there was violent spasm of muscles of thorax and upper limbs necroscopy, dark groove around neck crossing larynx just below pomumadami brain congested lungs emphysematous cricoid cartilagefractured diagonally laryngeal mucous membrane showed ecchymosis andœdema vertebræ neither fractured nor dislocated 83 another criminal hung at the same time had dislocation ofcervical vertebræ 84 fenwick. Canada med jour , 1867, iii , p 195 - man executed;drop six feet. Second cervical vertebra torn from attachment to third;medulla torn across. Hyoid bone and tongue torn from thyroid cartilage;general congestion of viscera. Lenses normal. Eyes congested. Clotbetween sclerotic and choroid coats left eye 85 dyer. Trans amer ophthal soc , 1866, p 13 - man, age 24;weight one hundred and seventy-four and a half pounds.

“the notion that amedical man may lawfully adopt such a method of treatment is not tobe tolerated in a court of justice;” and in this case and in others, convictions have been sustained for the crime of rape or of attemptingto commit rape 187another example of wilful malpractice would be wilful neglect of apatient by his medical attendant, who became intoxicated voluntarily, though this will generally come under the second subdivision, as moststates and countries have enacted statutes making it a criminal offenceto practise medicine or surgery when intoxicated acts forbidden by statute - within the second subdivision of thedefinition, or acts declared unlawful by statute, fall the paperof committing or attempting to commit an abortion, and paper ofprescribing for or treating a patient by one voluntarily intoxicated if the abortion is attempted without the knowledge or consent of thewoman, and under the pretence of performing a necessary operation uponher to cure disease, undoubtedly the physician would be liable to acriminal prosecution by the state for the offence of committing anabortion and to civil action by her to recover damages if the abortionwas committed with her consent, while she would have no right of actionagainst him for damages, he would be liable to criminal prosecutionunder the statute abortion not a crime by the common law - at common law it was nota crime to commit an abortion with the mother consent if the childhad not quickened in mitchell v com , 78 ky , 204 s c , 39am reports, 227, the court, per hines, j , says. “after a patientinvestigation we are forced to the conclusion that it was never calleda punishable offence at common law to produce, with the consent of themother, an abortion prior to the time when the mother became quick withchild it was not even murder at common law to take the life of thechild at any period of gestation, even in the very act of delivery ”see also evans v people, 49 n y , 86 the inhumanity and danger to society of this rule became manifest at avery early period, and both in england and in this country statuteswere adopted, varying essaywhat in the degree and kind of punishment andin the nomenclature of the crime, but all of them making the offenceof committing an abortion, no matter at what stage of gestation, acrime 188the common-law doctrine criticised - professor elwell in his valuablework on “malpractice, medical evidence and insanity, ” pp 250, 251, makes the following remarks upon this subject. “the idea once existedquite generally, and it still exists to essay extent, that there is nooffence in destroying the embryo or fœtus before there is a manifestknowledge of life by the mother, derived from motion of the childcalled ‘quickening ’ how absurd to suppose that there is no lifeuntil the mother can feel the muscular motions of the child!. as wellmight we deny the vitality of the blood because it cannot be felt the muscular tissues, and even the bones to which they are attached, must have essay degree of substance before there can be motion, and ofcourse this development depends upon life though this foolish notionis now fully exploded in medicine, it still lingers in the popularmind, and doubtless leads to much crime the life of the fœtus orembryo immediately after conception is just as positive physiologicallyas at any subsequent period quickening being an incident or signin the course of development of the fœtus, it indicates not thecommencement of a new state of existence, but only a new manifestationof pre-existing life it is uncertain in its appearance, essaytimescoming on at three months, essaytimes at six months, and essaytimes notat all ”legal definitions of terms, “quick with child, ” etc - in evans v people, 49 n y , 86, following r v wycherly, 8 c & p , 262, it was held that a woman is “quick with child” from the period ofconception after the commencement of gestation, but is “pregnant withquick child” only when the child has become “quickened in the womb ”this distinction has been discussed in state v cooper, 2 zab , n j , 52, and since the evans case, the same court in new york state hasheld that the expression, “woman with child, ” means “pregnant woman ”eckhardt v people, 83 n y , 42 s c , 38 am rep , 462 death of child by abortion - if, in attempting to produce anabortion, the child is caused to be born alive but before the end ofthe period of gestation, and when it is not capable of sustaining life, and it dies, the person producing the abortion and bringing the childinto the world at this time and in this manner is guilty of murder wharton crim law, sec 942. Rex v west, 2 cox crim paper, 500;com v brown, 14 gray, mass , 419 death of mother by abortion - so also where in consequence ofproducing an abortion the death of the mother occurs, the personproducing the abortion is guilty of murder at common law 4blackstone com , 201. 1 bishop crim law, 328 in essay of thestates, however, these offences are declared to be only manslaughter further consideration of the subject of abortion will be had under thattitle in another writing of this work statutes generally except abortions necessary to save life - itshould be noted here, however, that nearly all the statutes whichdefine and punish the crime of abortion, or the crime of manslaughteror murder committed in consequence of abortion, declare that when it isnecessary to produce a miscarriage in order to save life, the act ofdoing so is excepted from the effect of the statute negligent malpractice - under the third subdivision of thedefinition, viz , when by reason of the negligent acts on the writingof the physician or surgeon the patient suffers death or unnecessaryinjury, may be placed the most numerous paper of malpractice, accordingto the generally accepted meaning of the term criminal liability for negligent malpractice - it is manifest thatnot every degree of negligence which causes death or injury ought torender the physician or surgeon liable to indictment and punishmentfor a crime the general theory of the criminal law is based upon thedoctrine that in order to constitute a crime there must be eitheran intent to do the wrong, or such a degree of negligence in theperformance of a given act as to supply the place of the intent to dowrong, and require punishment for the protection of society, upon theground that the carelessness of the defendant is so great as to makeit necessary and proper to punish him, in order to deter others fromfollowing his example doctrine of leading case of com v thompson - in com v thompson 6 mass , 134, parsons, c j , observes. “there was no evidence toinduce the belief that the prisoner by his treatment intended tokill or injure the deceased and the ground of express malice mustfall it has been said that implied malice may be inferred from therash and presumptuous conduct of the prisoner in administering suchviolent medicines before implied malice can be inferred, the judgesmust be satisfied that the prisoner by his treatment of his patientwas wilfully regardless of his social duties, being determined onmischief to constitute manslaughter, the killing must have been theconsequence of essay unlawful act now there is no law which prohibitsany man from prescribing for a sick person with his consent. And it isnot a felony, if through his ignorance of the quality of the medicineprescribed, or of the nature of the disease, or of both, the patient, contrary to his expectations, should die the death of a man killed byvoluntarily following a medical prescription cannot be adjudged felonyin the writingy prescribing unless he, however ignorant of medical sciencein general, had so much knowledge or probable information of the fataltendency of the prescription that it may be reasonably presumed bythe jury to be an act of wilful rashness at least, and not of honestintention and expectation to cure ”the doctrine of the thompson case too broad - this lax statementof the law, made by the learned chief justice in this case, has beenmuch doubted and criticised it appears to be unsound in the length towhich it goes in requiring, in order to constitute criminal liability, what may be termed excessive gross carelessness or wilful grosscarelessness it apparently runs counter to the prevailing opinions ofthe english judges, and to the later decisions of the courts in theunited states, although it is followed and approved in rice v thestate, 8 mo , 561 in rex v long 4 car & p , 308-310, park, j , said. “i call itacting wickedly when a man is grossly ignorant and yet affects to curepeople, or when he is grossly inattentive to their safety ”so in rex v spiller 5 car & p , 353, the court said. “if aperson, whether a medical man or not, professes to deal with thelife and health of another, he is bound to use competent skill andsufficient attention.

But they must obtain acertificate from a duly licensed physician certifying that they havethe necessary knowledge art 3, 987 register - the medical board is required to cause to be kept by theregistrar a register of persons duly licensed and registered, andwho have complied with the law and the regulations of the board, andthose persons only whose names are inscribed therein are deemed to bequalified and licensed art 3, 988 the registrar is required from time to time to make the necessaryalterations in the register art 3, 989 evidence - the registrar, under the direction of the board ofgovernors, causes to be printed, published, and distributed to themembers, from time to time, a copy, called the quebec medicalregister, of the register, containing names, surnames, residences, medical titles, diplomas, and qualifications conferred by 5 paragraph essay sample a collegeor other medical body, with the dates of the same a printed copy, certified under the hand of the registrar as such, is prima facieevidence that the persons named and entered have been registered inaccordance with this law the absence of the name of any person fromsuch copy is prima facie proof that such person has not been lawfullyregistered. Provided always in case a person name does not appearon such printed copy, a copy or extract from the register certifiedby the registrar of the college of the entry of such person name onthe register is proof that such person is duly registered art 3, 990 a certificate under the hand of the registrar of the payment of theannual contribution of members of the college is prima facie evidencethat such payments have been made art 3, 991 neglect to register - a person entitled to register who neglects toregister is not entitled to practise medicine, surgery, or midwifery, or to claim any of the rights and privileges conferred, and is liablefor all penalties imposed for practising without registration, savingthe right of certain members holding a license from the college ofphysicians and surgeons of lower canada art 3, 992 established practitioner - a person who has attended medical lecturesduring three sessions of a medical school in the british possessions, and who has actually been engaged in the practice of medicine forover thirty years in the province, may, on proof of these facts tothe satisfaction of the provincial medical board, and producing acertificate signed by two resident medical practitioners in theneighborhood where he has practised that he has succeeded in hisprofession, and is entitled to the consideration of the board, beentitled to a license and to registration without an examination art 3, 993 unregistered persons - no person unless otherwise authorized isentitled to recover any charge for medical or surgical advice, orprofessional service, or for the performance of any operation, or forany medicines prescribed or supplied, nor is he entitled to any of therights or privileges conferred, unless he has registered accordingto law and paid his annual contribution to the college art 3, 994 no certificate required from any physician or surgeon or medicalpractitioner is valid unless the signer is registered art 3, 995 persons guilty of felony - any registered member of the medicalprofession convicted of felony forfeits his right to registration, and the medical board causes his name to be erased from the register art 3, 996 if a person known to have been convicted of felony presents himselffor registration, the registrar is required to refuse him registration art 3, 997 offences and penalties - a person not entitled to register convicted ofhaving practised in contravention of this law, for reward or the hopeof reward, is liable to a penalty of $50 a like penalty is incurred by every person assuming the title ofdoctor, physician, or surgeon, or any other name implying that he islegally authorized to practise, if unable to establish the fact bylegal proof, and by every person who in an advertisement in a newspaperor in a written or printed circular, or on business cards or on signs, assumes a designation so as to lead the public to believe that he isduly registered or qualified. And by every person who offers or giveshis services as a physician, surgeon, or accoucheur for gain or hope ofreward, if he be not duly authorized and registered burden of proof - in every prosecution, proof of registration isincumbent on the writingy prosecuted witnesses - members of the college are not incompetent witnesses byreason of their membership costs - the court imposing a penalty adds costs, and, in default ofpayment within a delay which it fixes, condemns the defendant toimprisonment in a common jail of the district for sixty days art 3, 998 evidence - in paper where proof of registration is required, theproduction of a printed or other copy or extract from the register, certified under the hand of the registrar of the college, is sufficientevidence that all persons named therein are registered practitionersand any certificate upon such proof, or other copy of the register orextract from such register, purporting to be signed by any person inhis capacity of registrar of the college, is prima facie evidencethat such person is registrar without proof of the signature or of hisbeing in fact such registrar art 3, 999 homœopathists - the rights of homœopathists are not affected by theforegoing sections art 4, 002 the homœopathic physicians and surgeons of the province form acorporation under the name of the montreal homœopathic association art 4, 003 the corporation has power to appoint three medical graduates of abritish or provincial university or medical licentiates of a britishor provincial college or board legally incorporated to be a board ofexaminers, to examine all persons who may desire to obtain a license topractise homœopathic medicine art 4, 008 a person desiring to be examined touching his qualifications topractise according to the doctrines and teaching of homœopathy shallgive notice in writing of at least one month to the secretary ortreasurer of the association, and show that he is not less thantwenty-one years of age. Has followed medical studies for notless than four years under the care of one or more duly qualifiedmedical practitioners. Has attended at essay recognized university orincorporated school of medicine not less than two six-months’ coursesof anatomy, physiology, surgery, theory and practice of medicine, midwifery, chemistry, materia medica, and therapeutics respectively, and not less than one six-months’ course of clinical medicine andmedical jurisprudence respectively, or their equivalents in time;and shall have complied with the regulations of such university orincorporated school of medicine with regard to such courses, andshall have followed such other course or courses as may hereafter beconsidered by the board of examiners requisite for the advancement of amedical education all such persons shall, at a regularly appointed time and place, beexamined on all the aforesaid branches by the board of examiners art 4, 009 if the board be satisfied by examination that a person is dulyqualified to practise either or all of said branches of medicine, astaught and practised by homœopathists, they shall certify the sameunder the hands and seals of two or all of such board the lieutenant-governor, on receipt of such certificate, may, ifsatisfied of the loyalty, integrity, and good morals of the applicant, grant to him a license to practise medicine, surgery, and midwifery, oreither of them, conformably to the certificate, and all such licenseesare entitled to all the privileges enjoyed by licentiates of medicine art 4, 010 the corporation appoints a secretary who keeps a register of names ofall persons duly licensed to practise medicine, surgery, and midwifery, or either of them, according to the doctrines and teachings ofhomœopathy only those whose names are inscribed in said register are qualifiedand licensed to practise according to the doctrines and teachings ofhomœopathy art 4, 015 the said secretary is required to make the necessary alterations inthe addresses or qualifications of the persons registered art 4, 016 offences and penalties - a person practising according to thehomœopathic doctrines for reward in contravention of this act, orassuming a title implying that a person is legally authorized topractise according to homœopathic doctrines, if unable legally toestablish such authorization. Or by advertisement published in anewspaper or in a written or printed circular, or on business cards orsigns, assuming a designation to lead the public to believe that he isduly registered and qualified to practise according to the doctrines ofhomœopathy. Or offering or giving his services as physician, surgeon, or accoucheur for gain or hope of reward, if not duly authorized orregistered, is punishable with a penalty of $50 burden of proof - in every prosecution, the proof of registration isincumbent on the writingy prosecuted costs - the court may condemn the defendant to pay $50 in addition tocosts within a delay which it determines, and to imprisonment of sixtydays in a common jail of the district on default of payment within thedelay art 4, 017 witnesses - a member of the corporation is not an incompetent witnesson account of his membership art 4, 018 fees - the provincial board of medical examiners may establishexamination fees art 3, 981 members of the college of physicians and surgeons of the province ofquebec are required to pay an annual fee of $2 art 3, 986 forensic medicine thanatological the legal status of the dead body. The disposal and obligation to dispose of the same. How and by whom it may be exhumed or removed. Autopsies, by whom ordered. The rights of relatives and accused persons including an appendix containing a synopsis of the statutes of the different united states and territories concerning same by tracy c becker, a b , ll b , etc , counsellor at law, etc. Professor of civil law and medical jurisprudence, law dewritingment, university of buffalo legal status of the dead body disposal and obligations to dispose of the same - there is no rightof property, in the ordinary sense of the word, in a dead human body;but for the health and protection of society it is a rule of the commonlaw, and which has been confirmed by statutes in civilized statesand countries, that public duties are imposed upon public officers, and private duties upon the husband or wife and the next of kin ofthe deceased, to protect the body from violation and see that it isproperly interred, and to protect it after it is interred a parent isbound to provide christian burial for a deceased child, if he has themeans, but if he has not the means, though the body remains unburiedso long as to become a nuisance, he is not indictable for the nuisancealthough he could obtain money for the burial expenses by borrowing itof the poor-law authorities of the parish, for he is not bound to incura debt reg v vann, 2 div c c , 325. 15 jur , 1, 090 on theother hand it has been held in england, that every householder in whosehouse a dead body lies is bound by the common law, if he has the meansto do so, to inter the body decently, and this principle applies wherea person dies in the house of a parish or a union reg v stewart, 12 a & d , 1, 272 and the expense may be paid out of the effects ofthe deceased tugwell v hayman, 3 camp , 298, and note in pierce v the proprietors swan point cemetery, 10 r i , 227, s c , 14 am rep , 667, the court said. “that there is no rightof property in a dead body, using this word in its ordinary sense, may be well admitted, yet the burial of the dead is a subject whichinterests the feelings of mankind to a much greater degree than thesismatters of actual property there is a duty imposed by the universalfeelings of mankind to be discharged by essay one toward the dead.

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But the flowers and fruit unripe are very binding, and so profitable for the bloody flux, lasks, 5 paragraph essay sample and are a fit remedy forspitting of blood either the decoction of the powder or of the roottaken, is good to break or drive forth gravel and the stone in thereins and kidneys the leaves and brambles, as well green as dry, areexceeding good lotions for sores in the mouth, or secret writings thedecoction of them, and of the dried branches, do much bind the bellyand are good for too much flowing of women courses. The berriesof the flowers are a powerful remedy against the poison of the mostvenomous serpents. As well drank as outwardly applied, helps thesores of the fundament and the piles. The juice of the berries mixedwith the juice of mulberries, do bind more effectually, and helpsall fretting and eating sores and ulcers wheresoever the distilledwater of the branches, leaves, and flowers, or of the fruit, is verypleasant in taste, and very effectual in fevers and hot distempers ofthe body, head, eyes, and other writings, and for the purposes aforesaid the leaves boiled in lye, and the head washed therewith, heals theitch and running sores thereof, and makes the hair black the powderof the leaves strewed on cankers and running ulcers, wonderfully helpsto heal them essay use to condensate the juice of the leaves, and essaythe juice of the berries, to keep for their use all the year, for thepurposes aforesaid blites descript of these there are two sorts commonly known, viz whiteand red the white has leaves essaywhat like to beets, but smaller, rounder and of a whitish green colour, every one standing upon a smalllong footstalk. The stalk rises up two or three feet high, with suchlike leaves thereon.