History

3 Page Essay


Therefore the administration ofmixtures of pepsin and pancreatin would be unjustified, even if bothconstituents could be expected to exert activity the foregoing observations apply to lactopeptine in powder and tabletform while mixtures of pepsin and pancreatin are unscientific andunjustified, theoretically the two substances may coexist in a solidpreparation, and the activity of such a preparation is consequently aproper subject of investigation theoretically as well as practically, however, pepsin and pancreatin cannot exist together in solution theclaims made for elixir lactopeptine and all other liquid preparationssold as mixtures of pepsin and pancreatin are therefore impossible the council has previously taken action the journal, feb 2, 1907, p 434 refusing to approve for inclusion with new and nonofficialremedies such preparations, calling the attention of the medicalprofession and of manufacturers 3 page essay to their worthlessness, and requestingthe american pharmaceutical association to instruct its committee onthe national formulary to omit from the next edition of that work aliquid preparation of pepsin and pancreatin recognized under the titleof “elixir digestivum compositum ”it is recommended that the council reaffirm this previous action, and that lactopeptine and elixir lactopeptine be declared ineligiblefor new and nonofficial remedies because of conflict with rule 10 “no article will be admitted which, because of its unscientificcomposition, is useless or inimical to the best interests of the publicor of the medical profession” manufacturers’ protest and council answerthe foregoing was submitted, together with the findings of the tworeferees, to the manufacturers they protested again, alleging that. Age of specimensfirst -- the specimens of lactopeptine examined by the second refereewere old the dates of manufacture corresponding to the several batchnumbers are supplied by the manufacturers as follows. 2275 powder september, 1908 2301 powder june, 1909 2312 powder december, 1909 2348 powder october, 1911 2352 powder december, 1911 2364 powder july, 1912 2374 powder march, 1913 2383 powder october, 1913 1638 tablets october, 1911the manufacturers assert that they do not understand how specimens ofthese ages could have been purchased on the open market in 1913 and1914, inasmuch as their agents are and long have been instructed totake up from the druggist all lots of lactopeptine which, as indicatedby the batch numbers, have attained “any appreciable age ” the age ofthe specimens, the manufacturers declare, deprives the table in thesecond referee report of “all significance or interest ”as previously stated, however, the specimens of lactopeptine examinedwere purchased on the open market in various localities in unbrokenpackages, in december, 1913, and january, 1914 they thus representstock used in filling physicians’ prescriptions or sold to thepublic neither the referees nor any one connected with the councilhad any means of knowing the age of the specimens until the dates ofmanufacture were furnished by the new york pharmacal association thefirst tests of the second referee were made in february, 1914, onspecimens 2374 and 2383, which were then, it would appear, about oneyear old and four months old, respectively the council has repeatedlyurged that pharmaceutical substances which are subject to deteriorationshould be dated by the manufacturer, and a similar suggestion hasbeen made by the bureau of chemistry of the u s dewritingment ofagriculture concerning mixtures containing enzymes notwithstandingthe instructions which the new york pharmacal association claims tohave given its agents, the market supply of lactopeptine in december, 1913, and january, 1914, was not composed of new stock, and untilthe manufacturers adopt the practice of dating packages, there canbe no assurance that it will be fresh in this connection, it is ofinterest to note that the bureau of chemistry of the u s dewritingmentof agriculture has issued a warning that it will judge such products bythe degree of their activity when they reach the consumer, i e , asthey are found on the market reports of other chemistssecond -- the new york pharmacal association cites the work of severalchemists, who have examined lactopeptine and report the presence oftryptic activity dr s r benedict in december, 1913, reported tothe council “distinct” tryptic activity digestion in twelve hours bylactopeptine of 4 2 times its weight of fibrin containing 50 per cent moisture in specimens examined by him these specimens were numbered2382, and were therefore probably manufactured in october, 1913;compare the dates furnished by the manufacturer for the specimens usedby the second referee no tests against other preparations possessingtryptic activity are reported, and dr benedict expressly disclaimsany opinion as to the therapeutic value of the preparation 27 dr p b hawk, whose report was submitted by the manufacturers, found inlactopeptine by fermi method one-fifth tryptic activity of that ofmerck pancreatin, and by grützner method an activity of 18 percent of the pancreatin a test for the production of tryptophan wasreported positive the new york pharmacal association also submitteda report from dr a w balch, who found pepsin, rennin, trypsin, steapsin, amylopsin and lactic acid present in lactopeptine. Alsoan amount of combined hydrochloric acid in 1 gm the equivalent of1 05 c c tenth normal solution or 0 00383 gm hydrochloric acid hereports digestion in twenty-four hours by lactopeptine of 25 times itsown weight of fibrin “an active extract of pancreas reacted exactlylike the lactopeptine solution ” the serial numbers of the specimenstested by hawk and balch are not given, but no doubt they were fresh 27 dr benedict personal communication to a member of the councilis as follows:“in the report of the council upon lactopeptine which you sent to me, i find the following statement. ‘careful examination failed to showthe presence of either diastase or pancreatin ’ in this connectioni will cite to you the following experiment carried out by myself:a package containing a 1-ounce bottle of lactopeptine powder withseal unbroken was purchased in the open market and opened in thislaboratory the label bore the special number 6 2382 two hundredmilligrams of this product was dissolved in 50 c c of a 0 25 per cent solution of sodium carbonate in water this solution was divided intotwo portions of 25 c c each one of these portions was boiled at once, and after cooling was added to 1 gm of moist fibrin contained in aflask the other portion unboiled was also added to 1 gm of moistfibrin contained in a flask both flasks after addition of 5 c c of toluene to each were stoppered and placed in an incubator at 37degrees, and left there for twelve hours examination of the two flasksat the end of this period showed that the one to which the unboiledsolution of lactopeptine powder had been added contained much lesssolid protein than did the other although this fact was obvious tothe naked eye, the exact extent of digestion in the two flasks wasdetermined by heating both to boiling, acidifying with acetic acid, diluting to definite volume, filtering and determining the nitrogen inthe filtrate by kjeldahl method subtracting the trace of nitrogencontained in the filtrate of the control flask, the results showedthat 42 per cent of the original fibrin present had been dissolvedby the unboiled lactopeptine solution this can be ascribed only totryptic activity under the conditions of this experiment furthermore, this is not simply a ‘trace’ of activity, but is at least sufficientlymarked to warrant a statement that this sample showed a distincttryptic activity inasmuch as i have obtained exactly similar resultswith two other samples of lactopeptine powder these being the onlyones i have examined, i am inclined to question the correctness ofthe council statement regarding the absence of trypsin from thispreparation as noted above, a fresh preparation was used -- ed “may i again add that i am making no statement regarding therapeuticvalue of preparation, and that i have no opinion upon that matter oneway or the other?. my work was undertaken solely out of interest tosee whether trypsin could exist in the powder which gives a markedlyacid solution when dissolved in water the elixir lactopeptine couldtheoretically show no tryptic activity, nor have i found any trace ofsuch activity in one sample of the elixir examined “in making use of any of the contents of my letters kindly include thestatement that my work upon lactopeptine was done without remunerationof any kind, and was done only for the scientific interest attached tothe question ” conclusionsthe new york pharmacal association demanded that the referee reexaminelactopeptine, making use of fresh specimens the council held that thiswas unnecessary, for the following reasons:1 the previous finding of the council, that specimens of lactopeptinefound on the open market are essentially weak saccharated pepsins, isnot to be refuted by examination of fresh specimens even if it beassumed that all old specimens of lactopeptine have been withdrawnfrom the market since the last purchase of specimens for the use ofthe council referee, there can be no assurance that the stock willbe constantly kept fresh unless the manufacturers date their product, physicians cannot know that their prescriptions are filled with freshmaterial nor is it reasonable to ask that the council examine themarket supply of any given proprietary at a time selected by themanufacturers 2 without entering into all questions of detail in the analyses, the council is willing to accept the reports of drs benedict andhawk as representative of fresh lactopeptine powder it is thereforeunnecessary for the council to make further experiments along thisline the results of these two chemists in no wise contradict theconclusions of the council referees, being comparable with thoseobtained by the referee on the fresher specimens used by them theexperiments of drs hawk and benedict show a degree of trypticactivity which, though chemically not negligible, is quite withoutsignificance practically, even if it could be assumed that the trypsinin the fresh lactopeptine escaped destruction in the stomach thefigures for tryptic activity given by dr benedict do not differmaterially from those of the first referee those of professorhawk show a tryptic activity of from 18 to 20 per cent of that ofcommercial pancreatin-- and commercial pancreatins ordinarily are oflow tryptic activity, if not inert see long and muhleman. Arch int med , february, 1914, p 314 the reports of these chemistspresent no reason for changing the conclusion that “it is a commercialimpossibility to market mixtures of pepsin, pancreatin and lactic acidso that they can display any material tryptic activity ”the results which dr balch obtained in a test for tryptic activityshow a marked discrepancy with those obtained by drs hawk andbenedict, not to mention the council referees, and also with thefact that only about 11 per cent of “pancreatin” is claimed in thepublished formula of lactopeptine the council is unable to accept dr balch result for trypsin or rennin as reliable his other results arewithout significance and call for no special comment 3 even if tryptic activity were conceded to lactopeptine, thepreparation, like all preparations containing pepsin and pancreatin, would still be, as previously stated, therapeutically irrational the council approved the report report of referee ain view of the manufacturer reiteration of the claims forlactopeptine powder, i have carried out further experiments todetermine its proteolytic and amylolytic power for the proteolytic test i used fresh, well washed fibrin and examinedsamples of lactopeptine powder numbered as follows:no 1 a writing of the english product examined and reported on lastspring no 2 -- a fresh bottle obtained at a chicago retail drug store indecember, 1913 no 3 a fresh bottle obtained at a chicago retail store in december, 1913 portions of 1 gm each of these samples were mixed with 5 gm fibrin, 100 mg of sodium carbonate and 50 c c of water in flasks a littletoluene was added to each flask, which was then closed with a tuftof cotton and the mixtures were incubated at 40 degrees throughtwenty-four hours at the end of that time there was no marked changein the quantity of the fibrin remaining in each flask, the larger writingby far being undigested as a control i used the sample of an active commercial trypsin, ofwhich i added 500 mg to the same quantity of water, fibrin and sodiumcarbonate this was digested in the same bath at the same time thedigestion was practically completed in less than ten minutes, onlyminute flakes of the fibrin remaining it is evident that the digestive power of the lactopeptine must beextremely low, and only a small fraction of that exhibited by acommercially good trypsin in an experiment with the english sample carried out through nineteenhours as above, using 2 gm of fibrin and 100 mg of ferment, it wasfound by nitrogen tests on the filtrate that about 12 2 per cent of the protein had been brought into solution, an amount which ispractically without importance in a digestion of such duration to test the starch digestive power i have made a large number ofexperiments in a series just completed i mixed 1 gm portions ofsamples 1 and 2 with water to make 100 c c volumes before makingup to the final volumes 0 5 c c of normal sodium hydroxid wasadded to neutralize the slight acidity of the ferment as shown byphenolphthalein of these mixtures 4, 6, 8 and 10 c c portions were mixed with 50 c c of 1 per cent starch paste and incubated at 40 degrees to find thecolorless end-point in the starch digestion, by the iodin test at the end of twenty-two hours the iodin reaction was as strong as atthe beginning, indicating no appreciable starch digestion to the flasks in which no digestion had taken place under theseconditions, 5 mg of a pancreas ferment was added this gave an almostimmediate conversion to the colorless end-point this ferment was asample of holadin which had been in the laboratory about a year the5 mg completed the reaction to the colorless end-point in less thanten minutes in a similar test i used 2 gm of lactopeptine no 3, made up to100 c c with 1 2 c c of normal alkali ten and 15 c c portions wereincubated with 50 c c of 1 per cent starch paste through twenty hoursat 40 degrees with no apparent result the holadin then added, 5 mg being used, completed the conversion in less than ten minutes this shows that the medium was a proper one for the test and that thelactopeptine must be extremely weak no sugar tests were made becausethe lactopeptine contains milk sugar to the extent of about 60 per cent similar results for both protein and starch digestives have beenobtained in a large number of experiments these here quoted showthat the ferment activity of the preparation is so low as to merit norecognition practically the digestion of a few milligrams of fibrin orstarch after thesis hours of contact, while being perhaps scientificallypossible, is of no value when we come to a consideration of the use ofsuch bodies as digestive ferments in medicine the amount of lactic acid or “loosely combined hcl” present inlactopeptine is very small, since the total acid which may be titratedby sodium hydroxid and phenolphthalein is measured by 0 5 c c ofthe normal hydroxid for 1 gm of the lactopeptine powder, in themean in different samples examined the range was found to be from0 41 c c to 0 6 c c tests with methyl orange, methyl red and otherindicators showed that the free acidity is but trifling. If the wholeof this acid, as measured by phenolphthalein, were calculated to hcl, the amount would be too small to have any appreciable physiologicactivity, in view of the daily dose recommended, 10 to 20 grains of thepowder report of referee bthe following table gives a summary of the results of my investigationson lactopeptine the numbers in the extreme left-hand column are themanufacturer identifying marks these, it is assumed, run serially, the higher numbers indicating fresher specimens table showing enzymic power of lactopeptine preparations amylase pepsin rennin trypsin lipase 2275 - - - 2301 - - - 2312 - - - 2348 - - - 2352 - - - 2364 - ?.

Dyspepsia, andthe indigestions generally, fermentative disorders, gastric catarrh, flatulence, nausea. Pancreatic insufficiency, intestinal indigestion;gastric secretory deficiencies, apepsia. Constipation and hepatictorpor. Intestinal stasis. Diarrhea. Infantile diarrhea, “summercomplaint, ” marasmus, inanition and malnutrition. Gastric atony anddilatation. Cholecystitis and gallstones.

For moist medicineslenify and make slippery, ease the cough, and help the roughness of thethroat these operations are proper to medicines moist in the firstdegree those which are moister, take away naturally strength, help thesharpness of humours, make both blood and spirits thicker, looses thebelly, and fits it for purgation the immoderate or indiscreet use of them dulls the body, and makes itunfit for action of drying medicines drying medicines have contrary faculties to these, viz to consumemoisture, stop fluxes, and make such writings dry as are slippery, theymake the body and members firm, when they are weakened by too muchmoisture, that so they may perform their proper functions yet although the members be strengthened by drying medicines, they havenotwithstanding their own proper moisture in them, which ought to beconserved, 3 page essay and not destroyed, for without it they cannot consist. Ifthen this moisture be consumed by using, or rather over use of dryingmedicines, the members can neither be nourished, nor yet perform theirproper actions such medicines as are dry in the third degree, being unadvisedlygiven, hinder the writings of the body they are appropriated to, of theirnourishment, and by that means brings them into consumption besides, there is a certain moisture in the body of man, which iscalled radical moisture, which being taken away, the writings must needsdie, seeing natural heat and life also consists in it, and this may bedone by too frequent use of medicines dry in the fourth degree. And itmay be this was the reason of galen writing, that things dry in thefourth degree, must of necessity burn. Which is an effect of heat, andnot of dryness, unless by burning, galen means consuming the radicalmoisture the use then of drying medicines, is only to such bodies, and writings ofthe body, as abound with moisture, in which observe these rules 1 if the moisture be not extreme, let not the medicine be extremelydrying 2 let it be proper to the writing of the body afflicted, for if the liverbe afflicted by moisture, and you go about to dry the brain or heart, you may sooner kill than cure thus have we briefly spoken of the first qualities of medicines, and inthe general only, and but briefly, because we shall always touch uponthem in the exposition of the other qualities, in which you must alwayshave an eye to these section ii of the appropriation of medicines to the several writings of the body that the qualities and use of these medicines may be found out, andunderstood by every one, and so my country reap the benefit of mylabour, they shall find them presented to their view in this order medicines appropriated 1 to the head 2 to the breast and lungs 3 to the heart 4 to the stomach 5 to the liver 6 to the spleen 7 to the reins and bladder 8 to the womb 9 to the joints chapter i of medicines appropriated to the head by head is usually understood all that writing of the body which isbetween the top of the crown, and the uppermost joint of the neck, yet are those medicines properly called cephalical, which areappropriated to the brain, not to the eyes, ears, nor teeth. Neitherare those medicines which are proper to the ears, proper also to theeyes, therefore my intent being to write as plain as i can i shallsubdivide this chapter into these writings medicines appropriated 1 to the brain 2 to the eyes 3 to the mouth, and nostrils 4 to the ears 5 to the teeth for what medicines are appropriated to an unruly tongue, is not in mypower at present to determine of medicines appropriated to the brain before we treat of medicines appropriated to the brain, it is requisitethat we describe what the nature and affection of the brain is the brain which is the seat of apprehension, judgment, and memory, theoriginal of sense and motion, is by nature temperate, and if so, thenyou will grant me that it may easily be afflicted both by heat andcold, and it is indeed more subject to affliction by either of them, than any other writing of the body, for if it be afflicted by heat, senseand reason, it is immoderately moved, if by cold, they languish, andare dulled, to pass by other symptoms which invade the head, if thebrain be altered from its proper temper also this is peculiar to the brain, that it is delighted or offended bysmells, sights, and sounds, but i shall meddle no further with thesehere, because they are not medicines cephalical medicines may be found out from the affections of thebrain itself the brain is usually oppressed with moisture in suchafflictions. Therefore give such medicines as very gently warm, cleanse, cut, and dry.

to the administration of intramine there are 3 page essay no contraindications ”we are also told that. “intramine is useful injected into the urethra in paper of chronic urethritis and perifolliculitis invaluable as a local application to chronic ulcers ”the intramine circular includes a “scheme of treatment for syphilis”which advises, in addition to intramine, ferrivine or salvarsan, mercury and iodids, the use of another proprietary called “collosoliodine ” an inquiry addressed to fougera & co in regard to thecharacter and composition of this preparation, brought the reply thatthe firm had no knowledge of its identity this “scheme of treatment” is objectionable in that it advises the“stock” treatment of a disease which demands individualization andfurther in that whatever beneficial effects may result from the useof mercury and iodid is likely to be ascribed to the preparations“intramine, ” “ferrivine” and “collosol iodine ”the advertising for ferrivine and intramine sent out by fougera & co contains no experimental or clinical data on which an estimate of theirvalue may be based apparently in england, where these products wereoriginated, little has been published regarding them there is, however, one report which may be accepted as a carefullycontrolled clinical trial in the lancet june 17, 1916, p 1214l w harrison, d s o , m b , ch b glasg , and c h mills, m r c s , l r c p lond , report on “the effect of ferrivine and intramine onsyphilis ” after briefly reviewing the theories which form the basisof mcdonagh proposed treatment of syphilis with his discoveries“ferrivine” and “intramine” the authors point out. “ that mr mcdonagh biological discoveries have not been publicly confirmed by any biologist of standing ”while. “ eminent chemists have confessed themselves unable to understand his chemistry ”the authors explain. “recognizing that this might prejudice our practical tests of intramine and ferrivine, we have taken writingicular care to guard against their influence, cross-checking our observations and submitting them to others for confirmation or otherwise ”harrison and mills chose for a test three ordinary paper of secondarysyphilis, paper with well marked lesions, the clinical progress ofwhich could easily be watched and from which it was easy to obtainspecimens for microscopic examination after a detailed account ofthe three paper-- which records grave conditions resulting from thetreatment and which shows the inefficiency of the drugs-- they write. “from the above account it will be seen that the local and general reactions which follow the injection of these preparations are by no means pleasant in the case of intramine the pain is undiluted torture and lasts so for two or three days one of us had previously treated four paper with intramine and the same local reaction occurred in these in two of them abscesses have burst outwardly, one of which is still discharging necrotic débris, ten weeks after the injection, and will take thesis more weeks to close in those paper where no abscess has yet burst it is easy to feel by the gap in the muscles that considerable necrosis has occurred none of these effects can be ascribed to sepsis, as most rigid aseptic precautions were taken further, writingicular care was taken to make the injections strictly intramuscular the constitutional symptoms which follow immediately upon the injection of ferrivine are distinctly alarming, and such as would cause one to hesitate before injecting this remedy into any but robust patients ”harrison and mills estimate the therapeutic effects of these drugs thus. “1 that ferrivine entirely failed to cause s pallida to disappear from the lesions of three well-marked paper of secondary syphilis “2 after the failure of ferrivine to cause the disappearance of spirochaeta pallida from a mucous patch a single dose of 0 3 gm salvarsan effected this in 18 hours, and the patch, which had hitherto been uninfluenced, had healed within 48 hours “3 clinically we were unable to detect any influence of either or both these compounds on syphilitic lesions, although each of them was of the variety which heals in a week or ten days under salvarsan treatment “4 further syphilitic lesions appeared immediately after the treatment in one of the two paper treated with both ferrivine and intramine a mucous patch appeared on one tonsil as well as further syphilitic papules from which spirochetes were obtained the other case developed nephritis, with albumin and epithelial casts. Which was not present prior to the injections ”while from these paper the obvious conclusion was drawn that intramineand ferrivine “have no specific effect on early syphilis, ” theseauthors subsequently treated a case of tertiary syphilis with thedrugs an intramine injection caused pain for several days but didnot stop the progress of the disease ferrivine was then administered“not without a feeling of grave responsibility” in view of theirprevious experiences they state that “the reaction which resultedin this instance was the most severe” they ever experienced afteran intravenous injection of any of the antisyphilitic remedies withwhich they had previously worked it is stated that “for a periodof essay minutes there was grave doubt as to the patient survival ”after resuscitation the patient passed a disturbed night, and rigorswhich ensued lasted until the following afternoon the author reportthat in this case also no clinical improvement occurred and that theintramine-ferrivine treatment was replaced by a course consisting ofsalvarsan, potassium iodid and mercurial inunction ferrivine, intramine and collosol iodine were declared inadmissible tonew and nonofficial remedies -- from the journal a m a , sept 8, 1917 eskay neuro phosphates report of the council on pharmacy and chemistryfor the information of the profession the council has prepared andauthorized for publication the following report on eskay neurophosphates w a puckner, secretary eskay neuro phosphates smith, kline & french co , philadelphia isoffered to physicians under the claims that it contains alcohol, 17 percent , and sodium glycerophosphate, 2 grains, calcium glycerophosphate, 2 grains, and strychnin glycerophosphate, 1/64 grain, in eachdessertspoonful it is called a “nerve tissue reconstructive, ” and itsadvertising claims are based on the discredited theories that certaindisorders are due to a deficiency of phosphorus in the nerve structureof the body, and that glycerophosphates are assimilated more readilythan ordinary phosphates this assumption was based on the knowledgethat the lecithins, which form a writing of the nerve structure, containedthe glycerophosphate radical in the molecule in line with this, smith, kline & french co aver. “eskay neuro phosphates is of marked value in thesis acute and chronic conditions, in nervous exhaustion following mental and physical strain, neurasthenia, paralysis, anemia, tuberculosis, marasmus, debility and wasting diseases generally, and the nerve-weakness of the aged it is writingicularly useful in convalescence from acute diseases and in the nervous condition following la grippe ”in its report on “the therapeutic value of the glycerophosphates” thejournal, sept 30, 1916, p 1033 the council pointed out that thetherapeutic use of the glycerophosphates was based on the assumptionthat the inorganic phosphates cannot supply the body needs ofphosphorus or that the use of organic compounds “spared” the systemthe necessity of making such synthesis the report presented evidenceto show that the glycerophosphates are not absorbed as such, butthat they are split into inorganic phosphates before absorption thecouncil showed that there was convincing evidence that the animalorganism synthesizes its complex organic phosphorus constituents frominorganic phosphates, and that organic phosphorus is of no more valueas a food than inorganic despite this the neuro phosphates advertisingmakes use of the fallacious assumption regarding the action of theglycerophosphates pleading for the writingicular mixture represented by the proprietary, itis asserted that. “sodium glycerophosphate is of special value in neurasthenia, addison disease, phosphaturia and phthisis ”and that calcium glycerophosphate “is employed in bone fracture, rachitis, tuberculosis and various wasting diseases ”the phosphorus content of 1/64 grain of strychnin glycerophosphate isridiculously small yet it is asserted that this strychnin salt is ofsuperior value because it combines the effects of strychnin with a“food-like form of phosphorus ” eskay neuro phosphates has an acidreaction which is capitalized, thus. “experiments have shown that the acid glycerophosphates are more rapidly absorbed and are more efficient than the neutral salts ”and as a further illustration of extravagant claims. “as a glycerophosphoric acid in the form of lecithin is normally present in spermatozoids, it is but natural that the glycerophosphates should exhibit aphrodisiac effects as has been observed, but this result does not seem to obtain in all paper ”is this a clumsy attempt to exploit this “nerve phosphate” as a “lostmanhood” cure?. The council held eskay neuro phosphates ineligible for new andnonofficial remedies because unwarranted therapeutic claims are madefor it and because the administration of strychnin, calcium, phosphateand alcohol is not conducive to rational therapeutics, writingicularlywhen such a mixture is marketed under a name which indicates but one ofits constituents -- from the journal a m a , sept 29, 1917 k-y lubricating jelly report of the council on pharmacy and chemistrybecause of inquiries received, the council has authorized publicationof the following report declaring k-y lubricating jelly inadmissible tonew and nonofficial remedies w a puckner, secretary k-y lubricating jelly van horn and sawtell, new york, originallyadvertised as a lubricant for instruments and the hands, is now alsorecommended as a therapeutic agent if the claims for “k-y” werelimited strictly to such effects as result from the purely mechanicalproperties of a lubricant, it might be held that it would not comeunder the purview of the council the preparation, however, whileintroduced as a lubricant, is now offered for a broader field of use, and the manufacturers make claims which are not supported by anyevidence available to the council evidence the following, taken from acircular that accompanies the package.

  • compare and contrast essay topics for college
  • custom finance papers
  • how to close an essay
  • holt homework help
  • uc application essay prompts
  • interpersonal communication essay
  • copy writing services
  • essay maker website
  • write a customized philosophy paper
  • business law homework help
  • copyright free research paper for sale
  • reflective essay template
  • how to do my homework fast
  • order a business plan
  • buy term papers online
  • same day essay
  • best college essay topics
  • paper writer
  • write my essays
  • business plan you can purchase
  • apa essay examples

For though authors say it is green all theyear, i scarcely believe it hart tongue is much commended againstthe hardness and stoppings of the spleen and liver, and against theheat of the liver and stomach, and against lasks, and the bloody-flux the distilled water thereof is also very good against the passionsof the heart, and to stay the hiccough, to help the falling of thepalate, and to stay the bleeding of the gums, being gargled in themouth dioscorides saith, it is good against the stinging or biting ofserpents as for the use of it, my direction at the latter end will besufficient, and enough for those that are studious in physic, to whettheir brains upon for one year or two hazel-nut hazel nuts are so well known to every body, that they need nodescription government and virtues they are under the dominion of mercury the writinged kernels made into an electuary, or the milk drawn from thekernels with mead or honeyed water, is very good to help an old cough;and being parched, and a little pepper put to them and drank, digeststhe distillations of rheum from the head the dried husks and shells, to the weight of two drams, taken in red wine, stays lasks and womencourses, and so doth the red skin that covers the kernels, which ismore effectual to stay women courses and if this be true, as it is, then why should the vulgar so familiarlyaffirm, that eating nuts causes shortness of breath, than which nothingis falser?. for, how can that which strengthens the lungs, causeshortness of breath?. i confess, the opinion is far older than i am. Iknew tradition was a friend to error before, but never that he wasthe father of slander. Or are men tongues so given to slander oneanother, that they must slander nuts too, to keep their tongues in use?. If any writing of the hazel nut be stopping, it is the husks and shells, and no one is so mad as to eat them unless physically.